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Vintage Portraits/ People

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Photos > Vintage Portraits/ People

submitted by Stephen Trifyllis on 02.09.2016

105 years young !

perhaps the oldest living person  on the island ..lovely tradoffoli souris ...105 years of age, born in trifllianika in 1911 ! now residing at the kytherian nursing home at potamo ..for over 10 years now , her husband, theodore souris, helped install the electricity to potamo in 1933 ... tradoffoli has 5 children , 10 grand children , 12 great grandchildren and 1 great, great grandchild !, i have know her since i was a small boy going to the island in trifyllianika , she still remembers village life as a young child ,people and events from the past, her mind for her age is amazing ....donations to the nursing home in kythera are greatly appreciated , they need the funds ..

Photos > Vintage Portraits/ People

submitted by Helen Souris on 18.08.2016

Family Megoloconomou

Aristidi and Metaxia (Zantiotis) Megolocnomou and daughters Maria and Grigoria

 

Photos > Vintage Portraits/ People

submitted by Barbara Zantiotis on 31.05.2016

Unknown male

This photo was located at my great uncle's house in Casino, NSW.  Does anyone know who it is?

Photos > Vintage Portraits/ People

submitted by Barbara Zantiotis on 02.05.2016

Tasia and friends 1954

These three ladies were teachers at the 'Domestic School' in Potamos where my mother learnt to cook, sew, knit and weave.  

The lady in the front is Tasia.  Does anyone know her surname or the other ladies?

Photos > Vintage Portraits/ People

submitted by Barbara Zantiotis on 18.11.2016

Leaving for Australia 1956

This photo was taken at the port in Piraeus in March 1956.  My mother, then Kyrani Anastasopoulos, was about to leave for her journey to Australia.  

Left to right - Kaity (her mother Kyriakoula was the sister of my mother's mother Barbara Komninou), Kyriakoula's husband, Eleni Anastasopoulos (her father George (Doupi) was the brother of my mother's father Peter), my mother, Kaity's brother, Anna Komninou (her father Anastasios was Barbara's brother), Peter Anastasopoulos (my mother's father), unknown girl who travelled with my mother all the way to Central Railway Station in Sydney, Kaity Komninou (sister of Anna), unknown friend from Piraeus.

 

Photos > Vintage Portraits/ People

submitted by Barbara Zantiotis on 18.11.2016

Friends in Auburn 1956

Back row - Koula (Cassimatis) and George Carydis, Kyrani (Anna) Anastasopoulos.

Front row - Grigoria Carydis (Tambakis), Theo Kepreotes, Anna Veneris, Theo Karedis

When Kyrani (my mother) and Anna Veneris arrived in Australia they went to live with Koula and George.  Grigoria is George's mother.  In this photo, Theo and Anna are engaged.  My mother was a bridesmaid at their wedding in June 1956.  When my mother married, Koula and George were the koumbari.  Theo Karedis is a relative of Theo Kepreotes.

Photos > Vintage Portraits/ People

submitted by Barbara Zantiotis on 25.04.2016

Kyrani (Anna) Anastasopoulos 1956

This photo was taken in Auburn, NSW not long after my mother arrived in Australia.

Photos > Vintage Portraits/ People

submitted by Barbara Zantiotis on 25.04.2016

Stephen Zantiotis about 1950

My father was born on March 10, 1928 in Weston, NSW.  His parents were Peter Zantiotis from Ayia Anastasia and Ekaterini Moulos from Logothetianika.  This photo was taken at a friend's wedding around 1950.

Photos > Vintage Portraits/ People

submitted by James Victor Prineas on 21.04.2016

Donkey Riding Mitata

From the collection of Fofo and Brettos Sklavos, Mitata

Photos > Vintage Portraits/ People

submitted by James Victor Prineas on 21.04.2016

Group from Mitata?

From the collection of Fofo and Brettos Sklavos, Mitata

Photos > Vintage Portraits/ People

submitted by Ernest Pappas on 01.04.2016

Panayiotis Prineas (1876-1957) ca 1914

Left for Australia 1901   to USA in 1904   back to Greece 1908 married Katerini Depontes and returned to USA in 1909 with Kayina, his mother Staveoula, and brother Theodore

Photos > Vintage Portraits/ People

submitted by John Minchin on 16.03.2016

Bylos family at Karavas

Angelo Bylos (Left) , wife Velio Tzortzopoulos (3rd from left), daughter Margaret (front) . Other couple unknown.

This photo was taken during WW2. Angelo and family were in Colombo en route to Kythera when war was declared.  They kept going and were stuck in Greece for the duration.

In a newspaper article titled "Clermont Man Aided Australians In Greece" it stated "Living with his wife and daughter on the island of Kythera, Mr Bylos, known to his many Clermont friends as "Andy," joined with a band of his countrymen and assisted Australian and New Zealand soldiers to escape to Crete their way to Egypt. When the Germans overran Greece he was cut off from the outside world and Mr J. Faros, his brother-in-law in Clermont, spent many anxious months awaiting news of the Bylos family."

Does anyone know who the unknown couple are?

Photos > Vintage Portraits/ People

submitted by Barbara Zantiotis on 05.03.2016

Arthur & Stephen Zantiotis 1943

My father Stephen was born in Weston, NSW in 1928 and his brother Arthur was born in Dapto, NSW in 1930.  My dad still remembers the fabric of his trousers feeling rough on his legs!

Their parents were Peter Steve Zantiotis from Agia Anastasia and Ekaterini (Katina) Moulos from Logothetianika.

Photos > Vintage Portraits/ People

submitted by Barbara Zantiotis on 05.03.2016

Arthur & Stephen Zantiotis 1938

Stephen, my father, was born in Weston, NSW in 1928.  His brother Arthur was born in Dapto, NSW in 1930.  

Their parents were Peter Steve Zantiotis from Agia Anastasia and Ekaterini (Katina) Moulos from Logothetianika.  

My dad is 87 and still plays the violin!

 

Photos > Vintage Portraits/ People

submitted by Theo Notaras on 08.01.2016

Current photo of Karava to accompany 1935 Vintage Photo

This Photo is Taken 80 years from the the first note the background of original photo matches the current. Entry to Karava .

Photos > Vintage Portraits/ People

submitted by Theo Notaras on 15.02.2016

Karavas circa 1935

From Nick Tzortzopoulos collection
Vintage Photo including a photo of the same location today.

Front row standing 2nd Falea Poulos nee Coroneo, 7TH standing Matina Notaras nee Tzortzopoulos,8TH Matina Vernardos nee Tzortzopoulos and kneeling 1 ST Nick Tzorzopoulos .

Photos > Vintage Portraits/ People

submitted by Lafcadio Hearn Files on 03.11.2015

Lefkada’s Hearn: Europe reclaims its literary ‘lost son’

BY DAMIAN FLANAGAN

SPECIAL TO THE JAPAN TIMES
OCT 10, 2015


Photograph: An age before Japan Hearn lived with his Irish great-aunt during the 1850's

The Greek island of Lefkada, rising from the Ionian Sea south of Corfu, is famed for its white beaches and vertical cliffs from which the poet Sappho is said to have leaped to her death. The island is also claimed as the one of the potential sites of Homer’s Ithaca, home of the great wandering hero Odysseus.

In July 2014, a museum was opened on the island commemorating the life of its other wandering son: Lafcadio Hearn.

Patrick Lafcadio Hearn (1850-1904) — named after Lefkada itself, but better known in Japan by his adopted name “Yakumo Koizumi” — is regarded by many as one of the greatest Western interpreters of Japan. Indeed, his voluminous essays about the island nation and his adaptation of ghost stories (“Kwaidan”) have been repeatedly translated into Japanese and have iconic status in the literary canon. Two museums — one in the town of Matsue on the Japan Sea coast and another in the town of Yaizu in Shizuoka Prefecture — are dedicated to celebrating his achievements and the 14 years he spent in Japan.

Hearn has been treasured in Japan for many years, but the opening of a museum in Lefkada, his birthplace, represents a new chapter in a remarkable story of his worldwide rediscovery.

In July, on the other side of Europe, the Lafcadio Hearn Memorial Gardens were opened in Ireland, in the coastal town of Tramore, County Waterford — a place where Hearn spent many of his childhood holidays. The opening was attended by the Japanese ambassador and Hearn’s great-grandson, Professor Bon Koizumi.

Indeed, across Ireland this month — in Dublin, Waterford, Galway and Mayo — Hearn is being introduced as a lost Irish literary son to the Irish themselves through an exhibition, live performances and a series of lectures entitled “Coming Home: The Open Mind of Patrick Lafcadio Hearn.”

But was Hearn Greek or Irish? In fact, several other countries also have strong claims to him, including England, America and Japan. Hearn was born the son of a Greek mother and an itinerant Irish father, a surgeon in the British army, who was briefly stationed on Lefkada when it was governed by the British.

Hearn was conceived out of wedlock and his parents quickly married before having the union later annulled, abandoning the child to the care of his paternal great-aunt in Ireland. Hearn never saw his mother again and his father remarried and moved to India.

Hearn was sent to boarding school at Ushaw College in England, but at the cusp of adulthood suffered two traumatic events: first he was blinded in one eye by a freak school accident and later his great-aunt’s wealth — which Hearn expected to inherit — was suddenly lost when she offered it as collateral for a relation who went bankrupt. Hearn was sent to the care of a former maid in London and soon emigrated to America, where he began his career as a reporter in Cincinnati, covering the roughest parts of the city.

Hearn moved on to New Orleans and steeped himself in the Creole culture, writing a cookbook, collecting songs and learning patois, as well as translating French literature and publishing a collection of Chinese ghost stories. He then moved to the French West Indies for two years, about which he published a travelogue, and published two novellas before embarking to Japan in 1890.

In Japan, too, Hearn quickly immersed himself in the culture, assuming a teaching job at the Normal School in Matsue and, within only a few months of arriving, marrying his second wife Setsuko.

Throughout his time in Japan, Hearn wrote prolifically, producing a new book every year, including such classics as “Glimpses of an Unfamiliar Japan’ (1894) and ‘Kokoro’ (1896). He fathered four children and assumed both Japanese citizenship and a Japanese name.

Famous in Europe and America in his lifetime, Hearn began to fall into obscurity after his death, though from the early Showa Era (1926-89) acquired a reputation in Japan as his works were published in Japanese. In the last 15 years, America has led the way in the rediscovery of Hearn’s fascinating reportage with several volumes devoted to his sketches of life in New Orleans and Martinique being republished.

“But if Hearn had remained in America, I would never have devoted years of my life to writing his lifestory,” reflects Irish scholar Paul Murray, whose 1993 biography, “A Fantastic Journey” helped kickstart a worldwide Hearn renaissance — Murray believes Hearn’s texts about Japan are still some of the most insightful ever written about the country.

It is long overdue for Hearn to claim his rightful place in the pantheon of Irish literary greats — it’s possible he would have played an important role in the Irish Literary Revival had he stayed in Ireland. Indeed it is the very folk tales and ghost stories recounted to Hearn while growing up in the wilds of Ireland’s Connacht Province that would later fuse with his appreciation of similar Japanese and Chinese tales. In an age of high-handed imperialism, Hearn took a profoundly anti-establishment Irish sensibility and questioning curiosity with him when he traveled abroad.

In 1904, Hearn died prematurely of heart failure at the age of 54 in Tokyo, just as he was contemplating making a return visit to London for the first time in more than three decades. Now he is finally being reclaimed by Europe, as fans across the world begin to appreciate just how far-reaching and ahead-of-his-time this visionary Irishman actually was.

Damian Flanagan is the author of “Yukio Mishima,” published by Reaktion Books, and “Natsume Soseki: Superstar of World Literature,” published in Japanese by Kodansha International.

Photos > Vintage Portraits/ People

submitted by Farrell Livingston on 06.06.2015

Sofokles, Matilda, and Rosetta Logothetis

Here is Sofokles with Matilda and baby Rosetta, who was born in Athens in 1925.

Photos > Vintage Portraits/ People

submitted by Farrell Livingston on 06.06.2015

Sofokles Logothetis

This was my great-grandfather, Sofokles Logothetis. He married Matilda Xirmaskesethis. He had a sister named Maria and brothers named Spyros, Minas, Nikos, and one other brother whose name we do not know.

Someday I hope to travel to Kythera to see where my people are from!

Photos > Vintage Portraits/ People

submitted by M Negas on 21.06.2015

Moulos Family Logothetianika 1937

Vasiliki Moulos, Theodore Moulos, Anezina ?, Smaragdo Moulos, Eleni Moulos & Anezina Moulos