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Seashells - Gastropods

Natural History Museum > Seashells - Gastropods

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Natural History Museum > Seashells - Gastropods

submitted by Museum Administration on 23.10.2003

Lurid Cowrie

The Lurid Cowrie, Cypraea lurida, is not as mottled as the other cowries, but just as shiny, with faint bands of lighter and darker brown on the outer shell. 4.5 cm long Photograph © James Prineas, 2003

Natural History Museum > Seashells - Gastropods

submitted by Museum Administration on 18.10.2003

Slit-Limpets

A type of sea-snail, the Slit-Limpet, Emarginula elongata, gets its food by browsing for algae. 1.5 and 1.8 cm long. Photograph © James Prineas, 2003

Natural History Museum > Seashells - Gastropods

submitted by Museum Administration on 18.10.2003

Keyhole Limpet

The Keyhole Limpet, Diodora italica, clings to rocks in shallow water. 4.8 cm long. Photograph © James Prineas, 2003

Natural History Museum > Seashells - Gastropods

submitted by Museum Administration on 18.10.2003

Keyhole Limpet Line-up

A chorus line of tiny Keyhole Limpets, Diodora gibbula, all around 1 cm long. Photograph © James Prineas, 2003

Natural History Museum > Seashells - Gastropods

submitted by Museum Administration on 21.10.2003

Mediterranean Limpets

Patella coerulea, the Mediterranean Limpet, attaches firmly to rocks very close to shore. 2.5 and 4 cm long.
Photograph © James Prineas, 2003

Natural History Museum > Seashells - Gastropods

submitted by Museum Administration on 19.10.2003

Rustic Limpets

Patella rustica, these Limpets are 1.5 to 3.5 cm long. Photograph © James Prineas, 2003

Natural History Museum > Seashells - Gastropods

submitted by Museum Administration on 19.10.2003

Lusitanica Limpet

Limpet identification is difficult and frequently requires expert knowledge. This specimen, 4 cm long, might be a Patella lusitanica.

Photograph © James Prineas, 2003

Natural History Museum > Seashells - Gastropods

submitted by Museum Administration on 19.10.2003

Limpets inside and out

Mediterranean Limpets, Patella caerulea, showing both conical tops and the dark, nacreous center of the shell's interior. Photograph © James Prineas, 2003

Natural History Museum > Seashells - Gastropods

submitted by Museum Administration on 19.10.2003

Green Ormer

The Green Ormer, Haliotis tuberculata, is happily quite common on Kythera. Its surface is finely etched and less sculptural than that of its common cousin. Photograph © James Prineas, 2003

Natural History Museum > Seashells - Gastropods

submitted by Museum Administration on 19.10.2003

Green Ormer, interior

The Green Ormer, Haliotis tuberculata has a lovely, green-tinged, mother-of-pearl interior. Photograph © James Prineas, 2003

Natural History Museum > Seashells - Gastropods

submitted by Museum Administration on 19.10.2003

Common Ormer

The outside of the Common Ormer, Haliotis lamellosa, has a sculpted, creased and darkly mottled appearance. Photograph © James Prineas, 2003

Natural History Museum > Seashells - Gastropods

submitted by Museum Administration on 19.10.2003

Common Ormers, interior

The inside of the Common Ormer, Haliotis lamellosa, is lined with gorgeous mother-of-pearl. Photograph © James Prineas, 2003

Natural History Museum > Seashells - Gastropods

submitted by Museum Administration on 19.10.2003

Three Rough Stars

Three Rough Star Shells, Astrea rugosa, in various stages of cleaning. At the top, an uncleaned shell as found in nature; to the left, a shell that has been cleaned with acid until the natural reddish-brown surface appears; on the right, further cleaning reveals a layer of creamy mother-of-pearl. Photograph © James Prineas, 2003

Natural History Museum > Seashells - Gastropods

submitted by Museum Administration on 19.10.2003

Rough Star Shell

Rough Star Shell, Astrea rugosa, 4.5 cm in diameter. Photograph © James Prineas, 2003

Natural History Museum > Seashells - Gastropods

submitted by Museum Administration on 19.10.2003

Calcerous Rough Star

An uncleaned Rough Star Shell, Astrea rugosa, shows the bumpy, calcerous coating and thorny spirals typical of this species. Quite common on Kythera. 4 cm diameter. Photograph © James Prineas, 2003

Natural History Museum > Seashells - Gastropods

submitted by Museum Administration on 19.10.2003

Opercula of Rough Stars

The Rough Star Shell, Astrea rugosa, has a brilliant orange operculum, the little door that allows the snail to close itself in. These opercula gleam like jewels, and in fact they are sometimes set as precious objects into gold rings and pendants. Photograph © James Prineas, 2003

Natural History Museum > Seashells - Gastropods

submitted by Museum Administration on 19.10.2003

Rough Star with Operculum

Rough Star Star, Astrea rugosa,, with the operculum set in place to show how the snail closes itself safely and snugly into its shell. Photograph © James Prineas, 2003

Natural History Museum > Seashells - Gastropods

submitted by Museum Administration on 19.10.2003

Thick Top Shells

The Thick Top Shell, Monodonta articulata, is very commonly found on rocks in the shallow waters of Kythera. These specimens are from Paliopoli. Around 2.5 cm diameter. Photograph © James Prineas, 2003

Natural History Museum > Seashells - Gastropods

submitted by Museum Administration on 23.10.2003

Three Cowries

Some beautiful Cowries of the species Cypraea spurca, whose naturally glossy shells give them a polished appearance. 3 - 3.5 cm long. Photograph © James Prineas, 2003

Natural History Museum > Seashells - Gastropods

submitted by Museum Administration on 23.10.2003

Smiling Cowrie

The underside of a Lurid Cowrie,Cypraea lurida, showing its silly grin. 4.5 cm long. Photograph © James Prineas, 2003