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Seashells - Gastropods

Natural History Museum > Seashells - Gastropods

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645:Natural History Museum > Seashells - Gastropods

submitted by Museum Administration on 23.10.2003

Bonnet Shell

Scotch Bonnet, Phalium granulatum, underside. 8 cm long. Photograph © James Prineas, 2003

644:Natural History Museum > Seashells - Gastropods

submitted by Museum Administration on 23.10.2003

Knobbed Helmet

Still quite common on Kythera is the sturdy Knobbed Helmet Shell, Galeodea echinophora, 5 cm long. Photograph © James Prineas, 2003

642:Natural History Museum > Seashells - Gastropods

submitted by Museum Administration on 23.10.2003

Giant Tun, detail

The hypnotic, spiraling point of a Giant Tun Shell, Tonna galea. Photograph © James Prineas, 2003

641:Natural History Museum > Seashells - Gastropods

submitted by Museum Administration on 23.10.2003

Giant Tun aperture

The Giant Tun, Tonna galea, lying on its side to show its wide, gaping aperture. Photograph © James Prineas, 2003

640:Natural History Museum > Seashells - Gastropods

submitted by Museum Administration on 23.10.2003

Giant Tun

Giant Tun, Tonna galea. Happily, these magnificent giant snails are still quite common around Kythera, and have been seen laying their eggs in the shallow waters of Diakofty. This specimen is 22 cm from tip to tail. Photograph © James Prineas, 2003

639:Natural History Museum > Seashells - Gastropods

submitted by Museum Administration on 23.10.2003

Little Tuns

Three little Tun Shells, Tonna galea. These sweet shells grow into giants up to 25 cm long. The youngsters pictured are just 3 – 3.5 cm long. Photograph © James Prineas, 2003

638:Natural History Museum > Seashells - Gastropods

submitted by Museum Administration on 23.10.2003

Necklace Shells

Three beautiful Necklace Shells, Natica hebraea, looking pretty enough to wear, are very common on Kythera. The ones pictured are 2 – 4.5 cm long. Photograph © James Prineas, 2003

637:Natural History Museum > Seashells - Gastropods

submitted by Museum Administration on 23.10.2003

Josephine Shell

A Josephine Shell Neverita josephina. Frequently found on Kythera, though less common than its close relative, the Necklace Shell. This one is 2 cm long. Photograph © James Prineas, 2003

636:Natural History Museum > Seashells - Gastropods

submitted by Museum Administration on 23.10.2003

Moon Operculum

The Moon Snails, which include Moon, Josephine, and Necklace Shells, have semi-circular, spiralled doors that close the snails safely inside their shells. The door is called an operculum, and in the Moon Snails it looks like a flattened version of the snail itself. This one is 2 cm long. Photograph © James Prineas, 2003

635:Natural History Museum > Seashells - Gastropods

submitted by Museum Administration on 23.10.2003

Moon Shell

Moon Shell, Polynices guillemini, a sweet little shell with a bullseye point. 1.2 cm long. Photograph © James Prineas, 2003

634:Natural History Museum > Seashells - Gastropods

submitted by Museum Administration on 23.10.2003

Necklace Shell aperture

The underside of a Necklace Shell, Natica hebraea, showing the semi-circular opening for the operculum. Photograph © James Prineas, 2003

633:Natural History Museum > Seashells - Gastropods

submitted by Museum Administration on 23.10.2003

Triton

The Triton Shell, Charonia tritonis, lives in deep water where it frequently becomes encrusted with calcerous growths. This one has been partially cleaned with acid to show the mottled outer shell. 22 cm long. Photograph © James Prineas, 2003

631:Natural History Museum > Seashells - Gastropods

submitted by Museum Administration on 23.10.2003

Triton aperture

Detail of the opening of a Triton Shell, Charonia tritonis, showing the dark, glossy, notched edges. From a specimen around 26 cm long. Photograph © James Prineas, 2003

630:Natural History Museum > Seashells - Gastropods

submitted by Museum Administration on 23.10.2003

Triton operculum

The dark operculum of a Triton Shell, Charonia tritonis, has an intricate pattern of whorls and swirls etched in a thick, horny plate. 6 cm long. Photograph © James Prineas, 2003

629:Natural History Museum > Seashells - Gastropods

submitted by Museum Administration on 23.10.2003

Triton operculum, underside

On the underside of a Triton operculum are concentric rings reminiscent of a slice of tree trunk. 6 cm long. Photograph © James Prineas, 2003

628:Natural History Museum > Seashells - Gastropods

submitted by Museum Administration on 23.10.2003

Slipper Limpets

A collection of Slipper Limpets, Crepidula unguiformis. The shells in this group are very thin, white and shiny, ranging from 1 cm to 2.8 cm long. Photograph © James Prineas, 2003

627:Natural History Museum > Seashells - Gastropods

submitted by Museum Administration on 23.10.2003

Pelican's Foot

The Pelican’s Foot Shell, Aporrhais pes-pelecani, is a favorite with children because of its funny name and funny shape. The pointy ‘feet’ help protect the snail’s soft head. These specimens are around 4 cm long, measuring to the very tip of their spikes. Photograph © James Prineas, 2003

626:Natural History Museum > Seashells - Gastropods

submitted by Museum Administration on 23.10.2003

Violet Snails

Violet Sea Snails, Janthina communis. These snails can grow to 2.5 cm, but the specimens pictured are less than 1 cm across. Despite their small size, they are striking for their bright purple color. Photograph © James Prineas, 2003

625:Natural History Museum > Seashells - Gastropods

submitted by Museum Administration on 23.10.2003

Wentletraps

Though very small and easy to overlook, the Wentletrap, Epitonium lamellosum, is among the most beautiful seashells in creation. The narrow cones have deeply notched whorls traversed by conspicuous ribs, giving the entire shell a finely carved appearance. These specimens are less than 2 cm long. Photograph © James Prineas, 2003

624:Natural History Museum > Seashells - Gastropods

submitted by Museum Administration on 23.10.2003

Giant Worm Shells

The Giant Worm Shell, Vermetus gigas, is an irregularly shaped tube with just a hint of the spiral coil common to other sea snails. Worm Shells can be white, yellow, brown and pinkish in color. Because of the way they twist back on themselves it's difficult to measure their lengths, but the ones pictured all have a diameter of around 1.5 cm across. Photograph © James Prineas, 2003