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Seashells - Bivalves

Natural History Museum > Seashells - Bivalves

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Natural History Museum > Seashells - Bivalves

submitted by Museum Administration on 17.10.2003

Turkey Wings

Noah's Ark Shells, Arca noae, also called Turkey Wings. Common around Kythera, these sturdy shells are frequently found intact. 2 cm, 3.8 cm and 3.5 cm long. Photograph ©James Prineas, 2003

Natural History Museum > Seashells - Bivalves

submitted by Museum Administration on 17.10.2003

Ark Shell

Ark Shell, Arca diluvii, 2.5 cm long. Photograph ©James Prineas, 2003

Natural History Museum > Seashells - Bivalves

submitted by Museum Administration on 17.10.2003

Bearded Ark

Arca barbata, or Bearded Arc. This shell has a bristly coat. 2.5 cm long. Photograph ©James Prineas, 2003

Natural History Museum > Seashells - Bivalves

submitted by Museum Administration on 17.10.2003

Bittersweet Clam

Bittersweet Clam, Glycymeris pilosa. 6 cm long. Photograph ©James Prineas, 2003

Natural History Museum > Seashells - Bivalves

submitted by Museum Administration on 17.10.2003

Yellow Violet Bittersweet Clam

Violet Bittersweet Clam, Glycymeris violacescens. The purple hue has been worn down on this clam, revealing a lovely brown and yellow concentric pattern. 2.8 cm long. Photograph ©James Prineas, 2003

Natural History Museum > Seashells - Bivalves

submitted by Museum Administration on 17.10.2003

Violet Bittersweet Clam

Violet Bittersweet Clam, Glycymeris violacescens, showing typical purple color on the outside of the shell. 5 cm long. Photograph ©James Prineas, 2003

Natural History Museum > Seashells - Bivalves

submitted by Museum Administration on 17.10.2003

Large Noah's Ark Shell

Noah's Ark Shell, Arca noae, also called Turkey Wing. 7 cm long. Photograph ©James Prineas, 2003

Natural History Museum > Seashells - Bivalves

submitted by Museum Administration on 18.10.2003

Large Fan Mussel

This majestic Fan Mussel, Pinna rudis was found near Diakofty. Also known as the Pen Shell. Gift of Zoe Paul. 31 cm long. Photograph ©James Prineas, 2003

Natural History Museum > Seashells - Bivalves

submitted by Museum Administration on 18.10.2003

Fan Mussel detail

A close-up view of the outer shell of a large Fan Mussel, Pinna rudis, showing strong 'teeth' standing in rows. Photograph ©James Prineas, 2003

Natural History Museum > Seashells - Bivalves

submitted by Museum Administration on 18.10.2003

Fan Mussel interior

The inside of a Fan Mussel shell, showing dark mother-of-pearl set against the delicate, translucent shell. 31 cm long. Photograph ©James Prineas, 2003

Natural History Museum > Seashells - Bivalves

submitted by Museum Administration on 18.10.2003

Date Mussel

The Date Mussel, Lithophaga lithophaga. 5.5 cm long. Photograph ©James Prineas, 2003

Natural History Museum > Seashells - Bivalves

submitted by Museum Administration on 18.10.2003

Bearded Horse Mussels

Two brownish-purple Bearded Horse Mussels, Modiolus barbatus. 3.5 and 5 cm long. Photograph ©James Prineas, 2003

Natural History Museum > Seashells - Bivalves

submitted by Museum Administration on 18.10.2003

Noble Fan Mussel

A beautiful example of the fragile Fan Mussel called Pinna nobilis. These odd and delicate shells stand upright in muddy sand. 24 cm long. Photograph ©James Prineas, 2003

Natural History Museum > Seashells - Bivalves

submitted by Museum Administration on 18.10.2003

Noble Fan Mussel interior

The inside of the Fan Mussel, Pinna nobilis, shows a brilliant orange color and delicate mother-of-pearl. 24 cm long. Photograph ©James Prineas, 2003

Natural History Museum > Seashells - Bivalves

submitted by Museum Administration on 18.10.2003

File Shell

File Shell, Lima lima showing its spiny exterior. 6 cm long. Photograph ©James Prineas, 2003

Natural History Museum > Seashells - Bivalves

submitted by Museum Administration on 18.10.2003

Gaping File Shell

Both halves of a Gaping File Shell, Lima hians. 3 cm long. Photograph ©James Prineas, 2003

Natural History Museum > Seashells - Bivalves

submitted by Museum Administration on 18.10.2003

Saddle Oyster, lower valves

The Common Saddle Oyster, Anomia ephippium has a thin, flat lower valve with a conspicuous saddle-shaped opening at the top. These lower valves are also called Jingle Shells, perhaps because of the musical, tinkling sound they make when shaken together. Photograph ©James Prineas, 2003

Natural History Museum > Seashells - Bivalves

submitted by Museum Administration on 18.10.2003

Saddle Oyster, top valves

The upper valve of the Saddle Oyster, Anomia ephippoum, is rough and scaly on the outside, but has a lovely orangey-yellow, pearly sheen on the interior. Photograph ©James Prineas, 2003

Natural History Museum > Seashells - Bivalves

submitted by Museum Administration on 20.10.2003

Oyster Attachments

The Common or European Oyster, Ostrea edulis frequently attaches itself to other shells. In this example, two oysters and a bit of coral have grown together. Photograph ©James Prineas, 2003

Natural History Museum > Seashells - Bivalves

submitted by Museum Administration on 20.10.2003

Two European Oysters

The upper valves of two European Oysters, Ostrea edulis, showing their irregular shapes and ruffled surfaces. Each about 3 cm long. Photograph ©James Prineas, 2003