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Insects and Kin

Natural History Museum > Insects and Kin

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Natural History Museum > Insects and Kin

submitted by Museum Administration on 14.09.2008

Rose beetle

In July, the artichoke blossoms open, attracting swarms of rose beetles. The shining emerald of the beetle against the pale purple flower has got to be one of Nature's most wonderful color combinations. Photograph by Peter B Tzannes, 2003.

Natural History Museum > Insects and Kin

submitted by Museum Administration on 14.09.2008

Stick-insect

These insects can spend long periods of time in a motionless, rigid position, which completes their astonishingly effective camouflage. Photograph by Peter B Tzannes, 2005

Natural History Museum > Insects and Kin

submitted by Museum Administration on 14.09.2008

Praying mantid

This Praying Mantid, Mantis religiosa, was perched among the flowers of a vlita plant, probably on the lookout for a tasty insect meal. Photograph by Peter B Tzannes, 2005

Natural History Museum > Insects and Kin

submitted by Museum Administration on 14.09.2008

Spider

Small spotted spider in a morning glory blossom. Photograph by Peter B Tzannes, 2005

Natural History Museum > Insects and Kin

submitted by Museum Administration on 14.09.2008

Question-mark vromopapadia

This shy millipede has a dark, glossy body that stretches and curls along the wall to form amusing shapes, transforming itself from a straight line into a question mark, a half-circle, or an ess-curve, then curling up into a little spiral when disturbed. Photograph by
Peter B Tzannes, 2004

Natural History Museum > Insects and Kin

submitted by Museum Administration on 14.09.2008

Vromopapadia

The vromopapadia is a harmless millipede whose names translates as 'stinking priest's wife.' That’s because, when prodded, the vromopapadia emits an oily, sickly, lingering stench. In dry weather, the vromopapadia hides outdoors, under leaves and rocks. Photograph by Peter B Tzannes, 2004

Natural History Museum > Insects and Kin

submitted by Museum Administration on 14.09.2008

Magnified exoskeleton

After this vromopapadia died, its outer shell took on beautiful colors and patterns, visible through a low-power microscope.
Photograph by Peter B Tzannes, 2004

Natural History Museum > Insects and Kin

submitted by Museum Administration on 14.09.2008

Vromopapadia rings

Even in death, when its body segments turn into a dry little heap of tiny white hoops, the vromopapadia can put out a repulsive smell. If you find it necessary to remove a vromopapadia, dead or alive, do so gingerly and respectfully. A piece of adhesive tape comes in handy. Photograph by Peter B Tzannes, 2004

Natural History Museum > Insects and Kin

submitted by Museum Administration on 14.09.2008

Soil centipede

The Soil Centipede is a snakelike, red-yellow, eyeless creature that wiggles violently. And he is fast! Photograph by Peter B Tzannes, 2003.

Natural History Museum > Insects and Kin

submitted by Museum Administration on 14.09.2008

Scolopendra Jaws

Like most centipedes, the Scolopendra has a painful, poisonous bite. Just look at those jaws! Photograph by Peter B Tzannes, 2004

Natural History Museum > Insects and Kin

submitted by Museum Administration on 14.09.2008

Scolopendra

The truly terrifying Scolopendra, who slithers around with a sinister, rippling movement on forty legs that all end in needle-sharp spikes. Photograph by Peter B Tzannes, 2004

Natural History Museum > Insects and Kin

submitted by Museum Administration on 14.09.2008

Blue-legged scolopendra

This small Scolopendra has blue-green legs.

Natural History Museum > Insects and Kin

submitted by Museum Administration on 14.09.2008

Scutigera

Scutigera is a centipede with a compact body fringed with fine, long limbs that resemble eyelashes. This particular example is missing several legs, poor thing. Photograph by Peter B Tzannes, 2004

Natural History Museum > Insects and Kin

submitted by Museum Administration on 11.10.2003

Bee

Unidentified honey bee. 1.5 cm. Photograph © James Prineas, 2003

Natural History Museum > Insects and Kin

submitted by Museum Administration on 11.10.2003

Mud Wasp

In summer time, the female mud wasp can be seen lugging a paralyzed spider along a wall. She’ll put her victim in a mud cell, then lay her eggs and seal the cell. When the baby wasps hatch, the spider will provide their infant formula.

Mud wasp, 2.5 cm. Photograph © James Prineas, 2003

Natural History Museum > Insects and Kin

submitted by Museum Administration on 11.10.2003

Wasp

Unidentified wasp. 2.5 cm. Photograph © James Prineas, 2003

Natural History Museum > Insects and Kin

submitted by Museum Administration on 11.10.2003

Cresent-horned Beetle

Spanish Crescent-horned beetle.

This horned beetle is astonishing to come across, but completely harmless. 2.5 cm. Photograph © James Prineas, 2003

Natural History Museum > Insects and Kin

submitted by Museum Administration on 11.10.2003

Green Beetle

Little Green Beetle.

Unidentified. 1 cm. If you know the name of this beetle, please add your comments below. Photograph © James Prineas, 2003

Natural History Museum > Insects and Kin

submitted by Museum Administration on 16.10.2003

Green Beetle, underside

Little green beetle, 1 cm long. View of underside. Photograph © James Prineas, 2003

Natural History Museum > Insects and Kin

submitted by Museum Administration on 11.10.2003

Rose Beetle

Rose beetle.

This magnificent, emerald colored beetle is happily quite common on Kythera, and catching sight of one glinting in the sunlight is always a treat. In “My Family and Other Animals,” Gerald Durrell writes about a Rose Beetle Man, who always had a fleet of rose beetles tied to strings buzzing around his hat.

Rose beetle, 3 cm. Photograph © James Prineas, 2003