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Culture > Nature

submitted by Harry (Charalambos ) ZAGLANIKIS on 10.01.2017

Agios Nikon in Winter

Rere Occasion

Culture > Nature

submitted by Kythera Island News on 08.12.2012

Hiking Adventure with Kythera Hiking

***Unfortunately, due to bad weather conditions, we have cancelled the walk to Diakofti. We will inform you shortly about the new date.

Thank you for your understanding,

The Kythera Hiking Team***

On Sunday 9th of December, at 11am, we will walk the freshly cleared path from the Kolokotronis Monument down to Diakofti, enjoying not only the amazing view the path offers to the Maleas Cap, but also the purple carpet of the bloomed Ericas...

Starting point: The Kolokotronis Monument on the road to Agia Moni

Duration: 1h 50'

Required: trekking or jogging shoes, windshield jacket

It is required to register in order to participate, so that we arrange in advance the way back with cars (except if you wish to walk the path back).

Please let Fivos Tsaravopoulos know if you wish to undertake the walk, either by email

Email, Fivos Tsaravopoulos or by phone (+30) 6937668338.

Participation is free.

In case of bad weather, the excursion will be cancelled.

We are looking forward to walking with you!

Organised by the Kythera Hiking team

Culture > Nature

submitted by James Victor Prineas on 18.03.2012

The Bakken Museum

The Bakken Museum‎
3537 Zenith Avenue South
Minneapolis,
Minnesota, 55416
UNITED STATES OF AMERICa

(612) 926-3878

thebakken.org

This is unique Museum, with a specific theme, which captures the imagination of people of all ages. Great Museums can have a singular focus, and still succeed spectacularly.

History & Mission

History


The Bakken Museum acquired its name from Earl Bakken. Bakken was born in 1924 and grew up in Minneapolis and received his training in electrical engineering at the University of Minnesota. In 1949 he co-founded Medtronic, which began by repairing medical electronic equipment, but soon began to sell and modify equipment, and to design and produce special-purpose devices. In 1957, working with Dr. C. Walton Lillehei, a cardiac surgeon at the University of Minnesota, Bakken developed the first wearable, external, battery-powered, transistorized pacemaker.

By 1960, Medtronic had become an established manufacturer of biomedical engineering devices, and in that same year began producing and marketing an implantable, portable pacemaker–that is, one that could be worn internally and that allowed the patient to move about freely. Today, Medtronic is a leader in the medical technology field and the world´s largest manufacturer of cardiac pacemakers.

Once his business was established, Bakken pursued his interest in the historical antecedents of using electricity for therapeutic purposes. In 1969 he asked Dennis Stillings, who worked in the Medtronic library, to see if he could “find some old medical electrical machines.” At that time, according to Stillings, there was not much of a market in antique medical-electrical devices, and instead, with Bakken´s agreement, he began looking for early books about the therapeutic uses of electricity. He didn´t know it then, but Stillings would be working over the next decade with national and international antiquarian book and instrument dealers to build the world´s only library and museum collection devoted primarily to medical electricity.

Through his contacts with dealers and with other collectors of early electrical and electro-medical books, Stillings developed leads on where to look for old machines to buy. By the early 1970s, he had assembled a sizable collection of books and was being offered significant early electrical machines. In 1974, two large lots of rare electrical devices were acquired.

During the first half of the l970s, the books and instruments were kept at the Medtronic corporate headquarters in St. Anthony Village, a suburb of Minneapolis, where a small museum was set up for their display. In 1975, the collection was moved to a Medtronic branch office at the Earle Brown Center, a corporate office complex in Brooklyn Park, another Minneapolis suburb, and one floor was turned over to the Medtronic Museum of Electricity in Life, as it was initially called. In October 1975 the collection was incorporated as a private, non-profit operating foundation and named the Bakken Museum of Electricity in Life.

In 1976, its present home was acquired–a mansion located on the west shore of Lake Calhoun in southwest Minneapolis. The house, called West Winds, was designed by Carl Gage for William Goodfellow and combines English Tudor, European Gothic Revival, and other architectural styles. It was built in 1928-30 and had been a private residence until it was acquired by Bakken. The library and museum staff and many of the books and instruments were moved in, although some of the collection was placed in storage in an old church for the next few years. In 1981, a 1200-square foot underground vault was completed, providing the latest in security and environmental protection. The vault temperature is maintained at 65 degrees Fahrenheit and the relative humidity held constant at 55 percent. Relatively little conservation work has been needed on the collection due to the excellence of this storage facility and the fact that most of the books and instruments were purchased in good to excellent condition.

In 1981, the name was changed to the Bakken Library of Electricity in Life in order to emphasize the importance of books and other printed sources. As educational programming became more prominent, the name was changed in 1986 to The Bakken. The Bakken is a 501(c)3 public non-profit organization. Charity information is available via the Minnesota Attorney General´s Office.

Mission

The Bakken Museum inspires a passion for science and its potential for social good by helping people explore the history and nature of electricity and magnetism.

Culture > Nature

submitted by Sydney Morning Herald on 09.02.2012

Underwater mapping … PhD student Ariell Friedman puts the Diver Rig underwater imaging technology developed in Sydney to use at Pavlopetri.

Student takes award for revealing submerged city's secrets.

Sydney Morning Herald February 10, 2012 page 3

Deborah Smith


The city of Pavlopetri, underwater off the coast of southern Laconia in Greece, is about 5,000 years old, and is the oldest submerged archeological town site. It is unique in having an almost complete town plan, including streets, buildings, and tombs. It lies on the mainland, directly across the sea, from Kythera.

MORE than 3500 years ago, before it disappeared under the waves, Pavlopetri was a thriving town in Greece.

It had two-storey homes, well-built streets, courtyards, tombs, and warehouses.

Today it lies beneath up to four metres of water, a fate that may have helped inspire the legend of Atlantis.

But the secrets of this lost city - the world's oldest submerged settlement - are at last being revealed with the help of ''revolutionary'' underwater imaging technology developed by Sydney scientists at the Australian Centre for Field Robotics.

To assist archaeologists excavating the ancient ruin, the team have used an autonomous underwater vehicle with stereo cameras, as well as a diver-pushed rig, to produce photo-realistic 3D recreations of the seafloor site.

Ariell Friedman, a PhD student at the University of Sydney and member of the team, said that it took a while for his eyes to make out the details when he first swam above the watery town but then the ancient streets, brickwork and shards of pottery became clear to him.

''What is so impressive about it is the age. It is still intact and some of it is over 5000 years old,'' he said.

The robot vehicle was used to map the entire site during an expedition there last year.

Mr Friedman propelled the smaller rig and was responsible for its missions.

This evening, at Sydney Observatory, he will be awarded top prize in Canon Australia's inaugural Extreme Imaging competition for students making advances in imaging science.

Mr Friedman said the team's underwater photographic and mapping technology, which has been under development for the past six years, is usually used for biological, ecological or oceanographic research.

''This is the first time these methods have been applied to an archaeological problem,'' he said.

The team's images and software then allows the archaeologists to zoom in and fly over the digital reconstructions of the site as if they were still diving it.

The University of Nottingham's Jon Henderson, who is an archaeologist working on the site, said the Australian technology produces ''phenomenal'' results in both shallow and deep water.

Pavlopetri was discovered in 1967 and its layout first mapped in 1968 by archaeologists using snorkels and tape measures.

Mr Friedman will receive $5000 for himself and $5000 for his university supervisors.

Culture > Nature

submitted by Odyssey Magazine on 31.01.2012

The Kythera Adventure. November/December 2011 ODYSSEY pp. 18-19

Photograph - Shot in the dark: two pistols, one encrusted with fragments of wine bottles, were among recovered items.

In 1802, one of the ships charted by Lord Elgin to transport the Parthenon Marbles to England sank off the coast of the southern Peloponnese. Most of its cargo was recovered but a Greek Australian foundation and the Hellenic Ministry of Culture have joined in a new salvage mission they hope will yield vital information about the ship as well as its cargo.

By Mary Sinanidis

Last July, a team of underwater archaeologists spent two weeks diving off the coast of Avlemonas, southwest of the island of Kythera. Their mission? To examine the shipwreck of the Mentor that sunk in the early hours of September 17, 1802, as it transported marbles from the Parthenon to London via Malta.

The story of the Parthenon Marbles - muggled out of Greece by Thomas Bruce, the 7th Earl of Elgin and British ambassador to the Ottoman Empire from 1799 to 1803 - and the ensuing controversy concerning their ownership is notorious. Few people, however, are aware of the details of their transport conditions.

Archaeological enthusiast, John Fardoulis, spokesperson of the Sydney-based Kytherian Research Foundation (KRG) that funded the expedition headed by the Hellenic Ephorate of Underwater Antiquities, says that few people are aware of the Mentor's sinking and its valuable cargo consisting of seventeen crates. He jokes that the god Poseidon may have had something to do with it to stop the marbles from leaving Greece.

The Mentor disaster, apart from having the trappings of an Odyssean tale, showcases a very embarrassing moment of the ongoing adventure of the Parthenon marbles. "lt provides a historical link to the Parthenon, socio-political influences at the time, and the history of maritime trade and shipping," says Fardoulis, who sees the shipwreck as a "time capsule".

The ship, a brig built in i 780, and it's eight-member crew set sail from Piraeus. But the notoriously strong winds at Cape Tainaro blew the ship off course before it finally rammed into rocks at Avlemonas. The crew survived, although the Mentor's precious cargo was trapped in the wreckage for two years. Lord Elgin paid exorbitant amounts to Kalymnos sponge divers, who could reach depths of over twenty metres, in an effort to salvage marbles from the sea bed.
Most of the cargo was recovered-at a cost. Some believe that the two-and-a-half-year salvage project may be partly responsible for Elgin's financial ruin which, in turn, led to his decision to sell the Parthenon Marbles to the British Museum in 1816 at what's been acknowledged as a very low price.

The Mentor's story doesn't end with Elgin. In 1975, the French sea explorer Jacques-Yves Costeau personally headed a mission to locate and examine the wreck. More dives followed, this time conducted by the Institute of Under"water Antiquities Research in 1980 and the Hellenic Ephorate of Underwater Antiquities in 2009. They all failed to recover or identify any pieces of statuary or marbles.
These unsuccessful missions did not discourage Dr Dimitris Kourkoumelis. In July, he led new, a ten- member salvage mission of the Underwater Antiquities Ephorate to explore the shipwreck in hopes that new technologies, techniques, and other resources might yield results. "We used a device called an airlift to excavate, a bit like a vacuum cleaner that removes sand/silt covering the wreck. It takes two days just to set it up properly," says Fardoulis. "We have a team that's focused on the project, prepared to dedicate the next few years in completing the research."

The team's optimism was rewarded. Three coins - two silver and one bronze-were recovered quite early, encouraging the team to probe further. "Finding ancient coins proves that other antiquities were being carried on the ship, not just crates of Parthenon marbles and sculptures," he says.

Also salvaged from the wreck were clay, glass, and porcelain tableware used by the Mentor's crew, two pistols, a cannonball, a compass and other items, including a clock showing the time of the ship's sinking. They also cleared a section of the wreck's shell, still in good condition. All these articles provide information on trade and navigation of the time.

"The early 1800s were a very interesting time for Greece and the Mediterranean, with power struggles between the Ottomans, French, Russians and British taking place. Piracy was also rife," says Fardoulis. "Finding a wide range of weapons on the Mentor shipwreck - a merchant vessel - helps remind us of how dangerous the Mediterranean was for shipping at the time." He states that this was highlighted by the many musket balls, two pistols and canon ball found as part of the wreck.

Findings are currently with the Ephorate of Underwater Antiquities, the body responsible for marine archaeology in Greece. Fardoulis hopes that the conserved artifacts might eventually be displayed in the New Acropolis Museum or in the Archaeological Museum of Kythera that has been closed for six years due to earthquake damage. Perhaps attention from the Mentor project will help reopen the island's museum, another of the Kytherian Research Group's goals.

"Kythera is a beautiful and relatively underdeveloped island tourist-wise, so an interesting story and inspiring imagery from the deep blue waters around the island will help increase Kythera's international profile," says Fardoulis, who adds that the excavation proves how people and foundations from the diaspora can help research take place in Greece. He notes the support of the Nicholas Anthony Aroney Trust and Kytherian Association of Australia that made this under-water excavation possible.

"Such efforts can lead to new chapters of history being written and shared around the world," he states, adding that this is just the beginning. "Key findings and conclusions will grow over time."

Culture > Nature

submitted by Odyssey Magazine on 31.01.2012

The Kythera Adventure. November/December 2011 ODYSSEY pp. 18-19

Photograph: Scraping the bottom divers worked collecting artifacts which they hope will shed more light on the ship and its voyage.

In 1802, one of the ships charted by Lord Elgin to transport the Parthenon Marbles to England sank off the coast of the southern Peloponnese. Most of its cargo was recovered but a Greek Australian foundation and the Hellenic Ministry of Culture have joined in a new salvage mission they hope will yield vital information about the ship as well as its cargo.

By Mary Sinanidis

Last July, a team of underwater archaeologists spent two weeks diving off the coast of Avlemonas, southwest of the island of Kythera. Their mission? To examine the shipwreck of the Mentor that sunk in the early hours of September 17, 1802, as it transported marbles from the Parthenon to London via Malta.

The story of the Parthenon Marbles - muggled out of Greece by Thomas Bruce, the 7th Earl of Elgin and British ambassador to the Ottoman Empire from 1799 to 1803 - and the ensuing controversy concerning their ownership is notorious. Few people, however, are aware of the details of their transport conditions.

Archaeological enthusiast, John Fardoulis, spokesperson of the Sydney-based Kytherian Research Foundation (KRG) that funded the expedition headed by the Hellenic Ephorate of Underwater Antiquities, says that few people are aware of the Mentor's sinking and its valuable cargo consisting of seventeen crates. He jokes that the god Poseidon may have had something to do with it to stop the marbles from leaving Greece.

The Mentor disaster, apart from having the trappings of an Odyssean tale, showcases a very embarrassing moment of the ongoing adventure of the Parthenon marbles. "lt provides a historical link to the Parthenon, socio-political influences at the time, and the history of maritime trade and shipping," says Fardoulis, who sees the shipwreck as a "time capsule".

The ship, a brig built in i 780, and it's eight-member crew set sail from Piraeus. But the notoriously strong winds at Cape Tainaro blew the ship off course before it finally rammed into rocks at Avlemonas. The crew survived, although the Mentor's precious cargo was trapped in the wreckage for two years. Lord Elgin paid exorbitant amounts to Kalymnos sponge divers, who could reach depths of over twenty metres, in an effort to salvage marbles from the sea bed.
Most of the cargo was recovered-at a cost. Some believe that the two-and-a-half-year salvage project may be partly responsible for Elgin's financial ruin which, in turn, led to his decision to sell the Parthenon Marbles to the British Museum in 1816 at what's been acknowledged as a very low price.

The Mentor's story doesn't end with Elgin. In 1975, the French sea explorer Jacques-Yves Costeau personally headed a mission to locate and examine the wreck. More dives followed, this time conducted by the Institute of Under"water Antiquities Research in 1980 and the Hellenic Ephorate of Underwater Antiquities in 2009. They all failed to recover or identify any pieces of statuary or marbles.
These unsuccessful missions did not discourage Dr Dimitris Kourkoumelis. In July, he led new, a ten- member salvage mission of the Underwater Antiquities Ephorate to explore the shipwreck in hopes that new technologies, techniques, and other resources might yield results. "We used a device called an airlift to excavate, a bit like a vacuum cleaner that removes sand/silt covering the wreck. It takes two days just to set it up properly," says Fardoulis. "We have a team that's focused on the project, prepared to dedicate the next few years in completing the research."

The team's optimism was rewarded. Three coins - two silver and one bronze-were recovered quite early, encouraging the team to probe further. "Finding ancient coins proves that other antiquities were being carried on the ship, not just crates of Parthenon marbles and sculptures," he says.

Also salvaged from the wreck were clay, glass, and porcelain tableware used by the Mentor's crew, two pistols, a cannonball, a compass and other items, including a clock showing the time of the ship's sinking. They also cleared a section of the wreck's shell, still in good condition. All these articles provide information on trade and navigation of the time.

"The early 1800s were a very interesting time for Greece and the Mediterranean, with power struggles between the Ottomans, French, Russians and British taking place. Piracy was also rife," says Fardoulis. "Finding a wide range of weapons on the Mentor shipwreck - a merchant vessel - helps remind us of how dangerous the Mediterranean was for shipping at the time." He states that this was highlighted by the many musket balls, two pistols and canon ball found as part of the wreck.

Findings are currently with the Ephorate of Underwater Antiquities, the body responsible for marine archaeology in Greece. Fardoulis hopes that the conserved artifacts might eventually be displayed in the New Acropolis Museum or in the Archaeological Museum of Kythera that has been closed for six years due to earthquake damage. Perhaps attention from the Mentor project will help reopen the island's museum, another of the Kytherian Research Group's goals.

"Kythera is a beautiful and relatively underdeveloped island tourist-wise, so an interesting story and inspiring imagery from the deep blue waters around the island will help increase Kythera's international profile," says Fardoulis, who adds that the excavation proves how people and foundations from the diaspora can help research take place in Greece. He notes the support of the Nicholas Anthony Aroney Trust and Kytherian Association of Australia that made this under-water excavation possible.

"Such efforts can lead to new chapters of history being written and shared around the world," he states, adding that this is just the beginning. "Key findings and conclusions will grow over time."

Culture > Nature

submitted by James Victor Prineas on 26.03.2010

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Culture > Nature

submitted by Spyro Calocerinos on 22.08.2009

CHURCH SERVICE AGIA ELESA

On the 2nd of August 2009 on a beautiful winters day. a Liturgy and artoclasia was held at Central Mangrove-near Gosford NSW- by Reverend Giannis Varvaris. A litany of the Icon around the church in this magificent position reminded many Kytherians of Agia Elesa in Kythera.

Culture > Nature

submitted by Dionisis Christofilogiannis on 28.06.2009

Dionisis Christofilogiannis, oil on canvas

dionisis christofilogiannis 1-12 sept 2009
Zeidoros Centre for the Arts & Education
80100 Kapsali, Kythera / tel.: +30 2736038212
arts@zeidoros.gr

Culture > Nature

submitted by Sydney Magazine on 25.10.2008

Mediterranean Cookbook

The late Alan Davidson (who sadly died at the end of 2003) had a distinguished career as a writer and publisher of books on food and cookery. His greatest achievement was 'The Oxford Companion to Food' (1999), but this was anticipated by his trio of books on seafood, of which this was the first (published in 1972), as well as studies of the fish cookery of Laos; an edition and translation, with his wife, Jane Davidson, of the 'Grande Dictionaire' of Alexandre Dumas, and even a novel, 'Something Quite Big', originally only samisdat, but finally exposed to the wider world in 1993.

Before turning to writing full-time in 1975, Alan Davidson saw wartime service in the Royal Navy Volunteer Reserve before entering the diplomatic corps with postings to Washington, The Hague, Cairo, Tunis and Brussels before his final appointment, as British Ambassador to Laos. 'Mediterranean Seafood' was indeed one outcome of his diplomatic travels, for the very first version of the book was designed to help his wife and colleagues unravel the linguistic puzzles encountered at the fish markets of Tunis.

This classic of modern culinary literature is at once a cookery book and a hungry naturalist's guide to the edible marine life of the Mediterranean Sea. First, there is the fully illustrated catalogue of fish and shellfish (not counting the sea slug and the sea anemone), complete with identifications of species in more than a dozen languages; then there follow more than 240 recipes drawn from the author's own experience and observation, from the advice of friends and family, and from the cookery literature of more than a dozen countries with a shoreline on the Mediterranean as well as on the Black Sea, its neighbour.

So much information, yet told in so beguiling a fashion: Alan Davidson's touch was of the lightest, always sweetening the pill of hard fact by a personal memory or a tale drawn from the byways of history or scholarship.

When the book was first published in 1972, it won the prestigious Glenfiddich Award for the best food book of the year. It has since been translated into five languages. This is a third revision, brought up to date for this edition.


REVIEW in The Guardian Weekend Magazine 21 Sep 2002

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The literary fishes

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The standard approach to Alan Davidson is awe-struck worship of his erudition and his precise but mellifluous prose. Both qualities gleam on every page of Mediterranean Seafood, first published in 1972. Full low-down on 200 species, giving everything you need to know. But Mediterranean Seafood is also a cookbook: a good catch of more than 200 recipes. Not only that, the recipes are more genuinely instructive than 90% of those from 'real' cookery writers. Full marks to Penguin, which kept this book in print for more than two decades. Ditto to Prospect, publishers of this new edition, for presenting it in a larger, more docile format. Watch for Davidson's two other seafood books from Prospect next year. (And for his newly paperbacked Oxford Companion To Food, just out at £20.) Mediterranean Seafood, by Alan David son, £17.99, Prospect Books.
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REVIEW in Saga Magazine, December 2002



----------------------------------------------------------------------
Consumer Culture

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Derek Cooper relishes a batch of authoritative books for the gastronome
With Christmas on the way I propose a fistful of books for food lovers, starting with two old favourites of mine now back in print. When Alan Davidson was a diplomat he was despatched to Tunis to represent the Crown. While there his wife, Jane, bewildered by the diversity of the catch in the fish markets, asked her husband to compile a guide to the marine life in that part of the Mediterranean.

It was little more than a Roneoed list, but a fellow diplomat was so impressed that he sent it to Elizabeth David, who wrote about it in her column in The Spectator. Jill Norman, who was then cookery editor at Penguin, persuaded Davidson to expand the original and it was published in 1972 as Mediterranean Seafood. It remained in print for a quarter of a century and became a classic. Now it is born again.

Mediterranean Seafood (Prospect Books, £17.99) is both learned and entertaining. It gives the names in seven languages of 150 species of fish and it offers more than 200 recipes from Mediterranean and Black Sea countries. Alan Davidson's great gift as a writer (which he deployed with consummate skill in his recent Oxford Companion to Food) is the ability to handle vast amounts of information without ever being dull. Prospect Books is also publishing Davidson's North Atlantic Seafood and his Seafood of South-East Asia. They make a spellbinding trilogy.

Culture > Nature

submitted by Anna Cominos on 26.10.2008

Unexplored Kythera & Anti-Kythera

Author:Tzeli Hadjidimitriou
When Published:2008
Publisher:Road Editions
Available: At any good greek bookstores
Description: 350 page travel guide to Kythera, that takes you off the-beaten track. With magnificent photos of the island by award-winning photographer & travel writer Tzeli Hadjidimitriou.

www.odoiporikon.com

Email, here

(Currently available only in Greek but will be available in English as of Summer 2009)

Tzeli is also the author of the book Kythera

Culture > Nature

submitted by Robin Tzannes on 08.11.2004

Scutigera

Scutigera is a centipede with a compact body fringed with fine, long limbs that resemble eyelashes. This particular example is missing several legs, poor thing. Photograph by Peter B Tzannes, 2004

Culture > Nature

submitted by Robin Tzannes on 26.10.2004

Vromopapadia indoors

This shy millipede has a dark, glossy body that stretches and curls along the wall to form amusing shapes, transforming itself from a straight line into a question mark, a half-circle, or an ess-curve, then curling up into a little spiral when disturbed. Photograph by Peter B Tzannes, 2004

Culture > Nature

submitted by Robin Tzannes on 26.10.2004

Vromopapadia outdoors

The vromopapadia is a harmless millipede whose names translates as 'stinking priest's wife.' That’s because, when prodded, the vromopapadia emits an oily, sickly, lingering stench. In dry weather, the vromopapadia hides outdoors, under leaves and rocks. Photograph by Peter B Tzannes, 2004

Culture > Nature

submitted by Robin Tzannes on 26.10.2004

Rings of a dead Vromopapadia

Even in death, when its body segments turn into a dry little heap of tiny white hoops, the vromopapadia can put out a repulsive smell. If you find it necessary to remove a vromopapadia, dead or alive, do so gingerly and respectfully. A piece of adhesive tape comes in handy. Photograph by Peter B Tzannes, 2004

Culture > Nature

submitted by Robin Tzannes on 26.10.2004

Scolopendra

The truly terrifying Scolopendra, who slithers around with a sinister, rippling movement on forty legs that all end in needle-sharp spikes. Photograph by Peter B Tzannes, 2004

Culture > Nature

submitted by Robin Tzannes on 26.10.2004

Blue-legged Scolopendra

This small Scolopendra has blue-green legs. Perhaps this coloration is typical of immatures, or maybe this creature belongs to a subspecies of the larger, yellow-legged variety.
Photograph by Peter B Tzannes, 2004

Culture > Nature

submitted by Robin Tzannes on 26.10.2004

Scolopendra Jaws

Like all centipedes, the Scolopendra has a painful, poisonous bite. Just look at those jaws! Photograph by Peter B Tzannes, 2004

Culture > Nature

submitted by Robin Tzannes on 26.10.2004

Soil Centipede

The Soil Centipede is a snakelike, red-yellow, eyeless creature that wiggles violently. And he is fast! Photograph by Peter B Tzannes, 2003

Culture > Nature

submitted by Robin Tzannes on 15.07.2004

Rose Beetle on Artichoke

In July, the artichoke blossoms open, attracting swarms of rose beetles. The shining emerald beetles against the pale purple flowers has got to be one of Nature's most wonderful color combinations.