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submitted by James Victor Prineas on 05.10.2017

An Island named Desire coming soon!

The scenes have been shot, and the editing has begun. See a preview at www.IslandnamedDesire.net!

Photos > Kytherian Art

submitted by Kytherian Cinema Review on 25.11.2015

Mad Max: Fury Road. Comic. Interior art by Riccardo Burchielli

Vertigo for the DC Fan: Mark Sexton Introduces the Mad Max: Fury Road Comic

By Mark Sexton

Wednesday, May 20th, 2015


Mark Sexton worked as storyboard artist and concept artist on Mad Max: Fury Road. He is also the co-writer, along with George Miller and Nico Lathouris, and co-artist of the Mad Max: Fury Road comic series.

Comics now available include:

The debut issue, Mad Max: Fury Road: Nux & Immortan Joe E #1
Mad Max: Fury Road: Furiosa
Mad Max: Fury Road: Max
Mad Max: Fury Road: Compilation Book
. (3 comics above, collected). All published by Vertigo, a division of DC Comics.

Other books available:

The Art of Mad Max: Fury Road, by Abbie Bernstein
ISBN: 9781783298167
Format: Hardback Publisher: Titan Books Limited

Mad Max: Fury Road – Inspired Artists Artbook. Deluxe Edition.
Various graphic artists. Commentary by George Miller and the artists
Publisher: Vertigo; Deluxe edition (May 12, 2015)
ISBN-10: 1401259030
ISBN-13: 978-1401259037

Mad Max: Fury Road is an amazing film, but as writer and concept artist Mark Sexton makes clear, the movie's only part of the story. For the rest, you'll have to head to the comic shop.

Cover art for Mad Max: Fury Road: Nux & Immortan Joe, by Tommy Lee Edwards

Cover art by Tommy Lee Edwards

Back in the dim, distant past—well, late 1982—I was a guest at a twelve-year old birthday party in a small flat somewhere in Adelaide (yes, I was twelve too, I’m not that old).

Sugared-up and full of red cordial, we bounced off the walls and each other, generally causing chaos but not too much property damage. The flat was a nice one, and under the television it sported a VCR (remember those?) and a small library of video cassettes in their clunky black plastic covers. In the midst of the hyperglycemic activity, one brave kid found a title with "R-rated” splashed across the spine, and in a thrill of illicit excitement, he stuck it in the VCR and pressed play.
It was Mad Max 2. You folks in the US of A know it as The Road Warrior.
And when the sound of that shrieking blower filled the air, and the camera pulled out of the darkness to begin 90 minutes of nitro-fuelled violence and nihilism, every single kid sat down in front of the television and didn’t move until the credits rolled. God knows where the adults were...
Suffice to say, I’d never seen anything like it. I was hooked.

Interior art by Mark Sexton for Nux and Immortan Joe. Mad Max: Fury Road

Interior art by Mark Sexton

Fast forward seventeen years—1999. I was in my third year of a career as a storyboard artist working in Sydney. I got a call to come in to the production company of George Miller to talk about a film he wanted to do, something about a dancing penguin… I had heard on the grapevine of dark rumours that something else was happening in the building… That after 24 years, the director of the Mad Max films was secretly working on a sequel. A dancing penguin didn’t seem like quite the same thing, and I figured that it was just that: rumour.
So I went into the magnificent old Art Deco theatre and was directed up to the big room in the centre of the building that George used as his office. I wandered in through the glass doors and stopped dead in my tracks.
On a big electroboard in black ink was a logo. Harsh, jagged, bold and arresting. Four words.
Mad Max: Fury Road.
And art! There was art. Crazy, bonkers stuff. Wild vehicles, combinations of classic cars with airplane tails and shopping trolleys, spiked metal and harpoon cannons, crossbows and carnage. My heart nearly stopped. The rumours were true!

Mad Max: Fury Road. Comic. Interior art by Leandro Fernandez

Interior art by Leandro Fernandez

I did end up working on the dancing penguin movie, Happy Feet, following the animated adventures of Mumble and spending five years designing the white and blue world of a digital Antarctica. But before that eventuated, I spent two glorious years sitting in that big room with George, co-writer Brendan McCarthy and vehicle designer Peter Pound and we boarded the crap out of a wild, totally insane story that the world is just discovering now.
Peter and Brendan moved on to other jobs and other projects, and at the end of 2001 it was just George and I who finished the boards. Two years! But I wanted to stay in that world…
“George? Have you ever considered doing Mad Max comics?”
George looked thoughtful. “Oh. Let’s see… Hmmm. I’ll think about it.”
Fast forward another thirteen years—2014. Fury Road had achieved the impossible and had actually been shot and was in the throes of post-production. It was thrilling to know the insane project had actually happened, but bittersweet having not had anything more to do with it. Ah, well. Then my phone rang—it was George.
“Hi Mark. About those Mad Max comics? I think it’s a good idea…”
And so these four stories—prequels of some of the key characters of Fury Road—are finally realised. These are not just mere ephemera—not just cynically produced stories that have been hacked out to tie into a summer movie. These are legitimately authentic tales that were dreamed up by George during the production of the film and were told to the actors themselves—tales that gave the characters they played depth and history. The tales of Nux and Immortan Joe. How Furiosa came to meet the Wives. And Max, making his way through the twisted and poisoned wasteland. All stories that flesh out these richly layered and fascinating people, and how they came to be what they are at the beginning of Fury Road.

Stories taken from the mind of George Miller... Given flesh by one of the co-writers of the Fury Road screenplay, Nico Lathouris, and myself. Illustrated and colored with enthusiasm and care by talented artists scattered over the globe. Every detail pored over and considered, altered and beaten into shape by the creators through the prism of years of immersion in the world of Mad Max. Stories that will give those folks who enjoyed the brilliant film a greater appreciation of the world and its history.
These are tales from the Fury Road.
So strap in, flick the kill switches, kick the engine over—and enjoy.

Photos > Kytherian Art

submitted by Kytherian Cinema Review on 25.11.2015

Mad Max: Fury Road. Comic. Interior art by Leandro Fernandez

Vertigo for the DC Fan: Mark Sexton Introduces the Mad Max: Fury Road Comic

By Mark Sexton

Wednesday, May 20th, 2015


Mark Sexton worked as storyboard artist and concept artist on Mad Max: Fury Road. He is also the co-writer, along with George Miller and Nico Lathouris, and co-artist of the Mad Max: Fury Road comic series.

Comics now available include:

The debut issue, Mad Max: Fury Road: Nux & Immortan Joe E #1
Mad Max: Fury Road: Furiosa
Mad Max: Fury Road: Max
Mad Max: Fury Road: Compilation Book
. (3 comics above, collected). All published by Vertigo, a division of DC Comics.

Other books available:

The Art of Mad Max: Fury Road, by Abbie Bernstein
ISBN: 9781783298167
Format: Hardback Publisher: Titan Books Limited

Mad Max: Fury Road – Inspired Artists Artbook. Deluxe Edition.
Various graphic artists. Commentary by George Miller and the artists
Publisher: Vertigo; Deluxe edition (May 12, 2015)
ISBN-10: 1401259030
ISBN-13: 978-1401259037

Mad Max: Fury Road is an amazing film, but as writer and concept artist Mark Sexton makes clear, the movie's only part of the story. For the rest, you'll have to head to the comic shop.

Cover art for Mad Max: Fury Road: Nux & Immortan Joe, by Tommy Lee Edwards

Cover art by Tommy Lee Edwards

Back in the dim, distant past—well, late 1982—I was a guest at a twelve-year old birthday party in a small flat somewhere in Adelaide (yes, I was twelve too, I’m not that old).

Sugared-up and full of red cordial, we bounced off the walls and each other, generally causing chaos but not too much property damage. The flat was a nice one, and under the television it sported a VCR (remember those?) and a small library of video cassettes in their clunky black plastic covers. In the midst of the hyperglycemic activity, one brave kid found a title with "R-rated” splashed across the spine, and in a thrill of illicit excitement, he stuck it in the VCR and pressed play.
It was Mad Max 2. You folks in the US of A know it as The Road Warrior.
And when the sound of that shrieking blower filled the air, and the camera pulled out of the darkness to begin 90 minutes of nitro-fuelled violence and nihilism, every single kid sat down in front of the television and didn’t move until the credits rolled. God knows where the adults were...
Suffice to say, I’d never seen anything like it. I was hooked.

Interior art by Mark Sexton for Nux and Immortan Joe. Mad Max: Fury Road

Interior art by Mark Sexton

Fast forward seventeen years—1999. I was in my third year of a career as a storyboard artist working in Sydney. I got a call to come in to the production company of George Miller to talk about a film he wanted to do, something about a dancing penguin… I had heard on the grapevine of dark rumours that something else was happening in the building… That after 24 years, the director of the Mad Max films was secretly working on a sequel. A dancing penguin didn’t seem like quite the same thing, and I figured that it was just that: rumour.
So I went into the magnificent old Art Deco theatre and was directed up to the big room in the centre of the building that George used as his office. I wandered in through the glass doors and stopped dead in my tracks.
On a big electroboard in black ink was a logo. Harsh, jagged, bold and arresting. Four words.
Mad Max: Fury Road.
And art! There was art. Crazy, bonkers stuff. Wild vehicles, combinations of classic cars with airplane tails and shopping trolleys, spiked metal and harpoon cannons, crossbows and carnage. My heart nearly stopped. The rumours were true!

I did end up working on the dancing penguin movie, Happy Feet, following the animated adventures of Mumble and spending five years designing the white and blue world of a digital Antarctica. But before that eventuated, I spent two glorious years sitting in that big room with George, co-writer Brendan McCarthy and vehicle designer Peter Pound and we boarded the crap out of a wild, totally insane story that the world is just discovering now.
Peter and Brendan moved on to other jobs and other projects, and at the end of 2001 it was just George and I who finished the boards. Two years! But I wanted to stay in that world…
“George? Have you ever considered doing Mad Max comics?”
George looked thoughtful. “Oh. Let’s see… Hmmm. I’ll think about it.”
Fast forward another thirteen years—2014. Fury Road had achieved the impossible and had actually been shot and was in the throes of post-production. It was thrilling to know the insane project had actually happened, but bittersweet having not had anything more to do with it. Ah, well. Then my phone rang—it was George.
“Hi Mark. About those Mad Max comics? I think it’s a good idea…”
And so these four stories—prequels of some of the key characters of Fury Road—are finally realised. These are not just mere ephemera—not just cynically produced stories that have been hacked out to tie into a summer movie. These are legitimately authentic tales that were dreamed up by George during the production of the film and were told to the actors themselves—tales that gave the characters they played depth and history. The tales of Nux and Immortan Joe. How Furiosa came to meet the Wives. And Max, making his way through the twisted and poisoned wasteland. All stories that flesh out these richly layered and fascinating people, and how they came to be what they are at the beginning of Fury Road.

Mad Max: Fury Road. Comic. Interior art by Riccardo Burchielli

Stories taken from the mind of George Miller... Given flesh by one of the co-writers of the Fury Road screenplay, Nico Lathouris, and myself. Illustrated and colored with enthusiasm and care by talented artists scattered over the globe. Every detail pored over and considered, altered and beaten into shape by the creators through the prism of years of immersion in the world of Mad Max. Stories that will give those folks who enjoyed the brilliant film a greater appreciation of the world and its history.
These are tales from the Fury Road.
So strap in, flick the kill switches, kick the engine over—and enjoy.

Photos > Kytherian Art

submitted by Kytherian Cinema Review on 25.11.2015

Interior art by Mark Sexton for Nux and Immortan Joe. Mad Max: Fury Road

Vertigo for the DC Fan: Mark Sexton Introduces the Mad Max: Fury Road Comic

By Mark Sexton

Wednesday, May 20th, 2015


Mark Sexton worked as storyboard artist and concept artist on Mad Max: Fury Road. He is also the co-writer, along with George Miller and Nico Lathouris, and co-artist of the Mad Max: Fury Road comic series.

Comics now available include:

The debut issue, Mad Max: Fury Road: Nux & Immortan Joe E #1
Mad Max: Fury Road: Furiosa
Mad Max: Fury Road: Max
Mad Max: Fury Road: Compilation Book
. (3 comics above, collected). All published by Vertigo, a division of DC Comics.

Other books available:

The Art of Mad Max: Fury Road, by Abbie Bernstein
ISBN: 9781783298167
Format: Hardback Publisher: Titan Books Limited

Mad Max: Fury Road – Inspired Artists Artbook. Deluxe Edition.
Various graphic artists. Commentary by George Miller and the artists
Publisher: Vertigo; Deluxe edition (May 12, 2015)
ISBN-10: 1401259030
ISBN-13: 978-1401259037

Mad Max: Fury Road is an amazing film, but as writer and concept artist Mark Sexton makes clear, the movie's only part of the story. For the rest, you'll have to head to the comic shop.

Cover art for Mad Max: Fury Road: Nux & Immortan Joe, by Tommy Lee Edwards

Cover art by Tommy Lee Edwards

Back in the dim, distant past—well, late 1982—I was a guest at a twelve-year old birthday party in a small flat somewhere in Adelaide (yes, I was twelve too, I’m not that old).

Sugared-up and full of red cordial, we bounced off the walls and each other, generally causing chaos but not too much property damage. The flat was a nice one, and under the television it sported a VCR (remember those?) and a small library of video cassettes in their clunky black plastic covers. In the midst of the hyperglycemic activity, one brave kid found a title with "R-rated” splashed across the spine, and in a thrill of illicit excitement, he stuck it in the VCR and pressed play.
It was Mad Max 2. You folks in the US of A know it as The Road Warrior.
And when the sound of that shrieking blower filled the air, and the camera pulled out of the darkness to begin 90 minutes of nitro-fuelled violence and nihilism, every single kid sat down in front of the television and didn’t move until the credits rolled. God knows where the adults were...
Suffice to say, I’d never seen anything like it. I was hooked.

Fast forward seventeen years—1999. I was in my third year of a career as a storyboard artist working in Sydney. I got a call to come in to the production company of George Miller to talk about a film he wanted to do, something about a dancing penguin… I had heard on the grapevine of dark rumours that something else was happening in the building… That after 24 years, the director of the Mad Max films was secretly working on a sequel. A dancing penguin didn’t seem like quite the same thing, and I figured that it was just that: rumour.
So I went into the magnificent old Art Deco theatre and was directed up to the big room in the centre of the building that George used as his office. I wandered in through the glass doors and stopped dead in my tracks.
On a big electroboard in black ink was a logo. Harsh, jagged, bold and arresting. Four words.
Mad Max: Fury Road.
And art! There was art. Crazy, bonkers stuff. Wild vehicles, combinations of classic cars with airplane tails and shopping trolleys, spiked metal and harpoon cannons, crossbows and carnage. My heart nearly stopped. The rumours were true!

Mad Max: Fury Road. Comic. Interior art by Leandro Fernandez

I did end up working on the dancing penguin movie, Happy Feet, following the animated adventures of Mumble and spending five years designing the white and blue world of a digital Antarctica. But before that eventuated, I spent two glorious years sitting in that big room with George, co-writer Brendan McCarthy and vehicle designer Peter Pound and we boarded the crap out of a wild, totally insane story that the world is just discovering now.
Peter and Brendan moved on to other jobs and other projects, and at the end of 2001 it was just George and I who finished the boards. Two years! But I wanted to stay in that world…
“George? Have you ever considered doing Mad Max comics?”
George looked thoughtful. “Oh. Let’s see… Hmmm. I’ll think about it.”
Fast forward another thirteen years—2014. Fury Road had achieved the impossible and had actually been shot and was in the throes of post-production. It was thrilling to know the insane project had actually happened, but bittersweet having not had anything more to do with it. Ah, well. Then my phone rang—it was George.
“Hi Mark. About those Mad Max comics? I think it’s a good idea…”
And so these four stories—prequels of some of the key characters of Fury Road—are finally realised. These are not just mere ephemera—not just cynically produced stories that have been hacked out to tie into a summer movie. These are legitimately authentic tales that were dreamed up by George during the production of the film and were told to the actors themselves—tales that gave the characters they played depth and history. The tales of Nux and Immortan Joe. How Furiosa came to meet the Wives. And Max, making his way through the twisted and poisoned wasteland. All stories that flesh out these richly layered and fascinating people, and how they came to be what they are at the beginning of Fury Road.

Mad Max: Fury Road. Comic. Interior art by Riccardo Burchielli

Stories taken from the mind of George Miller... Given flesh by one of the co-writers of the Fury Road screenplay, Nico Lathouris, and myself. Illustrated and colored with enthusiasm and care by talented artists scattered over the globe. Every detail pored over and considered, altered and beaten into shape by the creators through the prism of years of immersion in the world of Mad Max. Stories that will give those folks who enjoyed the brilliant film a greater appreciation of the world and its history.
These are tales from the Fury Road.
So strap in, flick the kill switches, kick the engine over—and enjoy.

Photos > Kytherian Art

submitted by Kytherian Cinema Review on 23.11.2015

Cover art for Mad Max: Fury Road: Nux & Immortan Joe, by Tommy Lee Edwards

Vertigo for the DC Fan: Mark Sexton Introduces the Mad Max: Fury Road Comic

By Mark Sexton

Wednesday, May 20th, 2015


Mark Sexton worked as storyboard artist and concept artist on Mad Max: Fury Road. He is also the co-writer, along with George Miller and Nico Lathouris, and co-artist of the Mad Max: Fury Road comic series.

Comics now available include:

The debut issue, Mad Max: Fury Road: Nux & Immortan Joe E #1
Mad Max: Fury Road: Furiosa
Mad Max: Fury Road: Max
Mad Max: Fury Road: Compilation Book (3 comics above, collected)


Mad Max: Fury Road is an amazing film, but as writer and concept artist Mark Sexton makes clear, the movie's only part of the story. For the rest, you'll have to head to the comic shop.

Back in the dim, distant past—well, late 1982—I was a guest at a twelve-year old birthday party in a small flat somewhere in Adelaide (yes, I was twelve too, I’m not that old).

Sugared-up and full of red cordial, we bounced off the walls and each other, generally causing chaos but not too much property damage. The flat was a nice one, and under the television it sported a VCR (remember those?) and a small library of video cassettes in their clunky black plastic covers. In the midst of the hyperglycemic activity, one brave kid found a title with "R-rated” splashed across the spine, and in a thrill of illicit excitement, he stuck it in the VCR and pressed play.
It was Mad Max 2. You folks in the US of A know it as The Road Warrior.
And when the sound of that shrieking blower filled the air, and the camera pulled out of the darkness to begin 90 minutes of nitro-fuelled violence and nihilism, every single kid sat down in front of the television and didn’t move until the credits rolled. God knows where the adults were...
Suffice to say, I’d never seen anything like it. I was hooked.

Interior art by Mark Sexton for Nux and Immortan Joe. Mad Max: Fury Road

Fast forward seventeen years—1999. I was in my third year of a career as a storyboard artist working in Sydney. I got a call to come in to the production company of George Miller to talk about a film he wanted to do, something about a dancing penguin… I had heard on the grapevine of dark rumours that something else was happening in the building… That after 24 years, the director of the Mad Max films was secretly working on a sequel. A dancing penguin didn’t seem like quite the same thing, and I figured that it was just that: rumour.
So I went into the magnificent old Art Deco theatre and was directed up to the big room in the centre of the building that George used as his office. I wandered in through the glass doors and stopped dead in my tracks.
On a big electroboard in black ink was a logo. Harsh, jagged, bold and arresting. Four words.
Mad Max: Fury Road.
And art! There was art. Crazy, bonkers stuff. Wild vehicles, combinations of classic cars with airplane tails and shopping trolleys, spiked metal and harpoon cannons, crossbows and carnage. My heart nearly stopped. The rumours were true!

Mad Max: Fury Road. Comic. Interior art by Leandro Fernandez

I did end up working on the dancing penguin movie, Happy Feet, following the animated adventures of Mumble and spending five years designing the white and blue world of a digital Antarctica. But before that eventuated, I spent two glorious years sitting in that big room with George, co-writer Brendan McCarthy and vehicle designer Peter Pound and we boarded the crap out of a wild, totally insane story that the world is just discovering now.
Peter and Brendan moved on to other jobs and other projects, and at the end of 2001 it was just George and I who finished the boards. Two years! But I wanted to stay in that world…
“George? Have you ever considered doing Mad Max comics?”
George looked thoughtful. “Oh. Let’s see… Hmmm. I’ll think about it.”
Fast forward another thirteen years—2014. Fury Road had achieved the impossible and had actually been shot and was in the throes of post-production. It was thrilling to know the insane project had actually happened, but bittersweet having not had anything more to do with it. Ah, well. Then my phone rang—it was George.
“Hi Mark. About those Mad Max comics? I think it’s a good idea…”
And so these four stories—prequels of some of the key characters of Fury Road—are finally realised. These are not just mere ephemera—not just cynically produced stories that have been hacked out to tie into a summer movie. These are legitimately authentic tales that were dreamed up by George during the production of the film and were told to the actors themselves—tales that gave the characters they played depth and history. The tales of Nux and Immortan Joe. How Furiosa came to meet the Wives. And Max, making his way through the twisted and poisoned wasteland. All stories that flesh out these richly layered and fascinating people, and how they came to be what they are at the beginning of Fury Road.

Mad Max: Fury Road. Comic. Interior art by Riccardo Burchielli

Stories taken from the mind of George Miller... Given flesh by one of the co-writers of the Fury Road screenplay, Nico Lathouris, and myself. Illustrated and colored with enthusiasm and care by talented artists scattered over the globe. Every detail pored over and considered, altered and beaten into shape by the creators through the prism of years of immersion in the world of Mad Max. Stories that will give those folks who enjoyed the brilliant film a greater appreciation of the world and its history.
These are tales from the Fury Road.
So strap in, flick the kill switches, kick the engine over—and enjoy.

Photos > Kytherian Art

submitted by George Tzannes on 31.07.2015

Art Exhibition

ARTIFACT
The works exhibited here are inspired by the material culture of the people who have lived on Kythera. An artifact is defined as an object made by a human being. It is an object made for use in context of human activity and therefore is an expression of the culture of the people who made and used it. I made these works at different times over more than forty years, so the exhibition is a retrospective focused on material things found or located on Kythera.
The cement frescos are of Minoan pottery excavated from Paliopolis and they are what one usually thinks of as an artifact. The paintings of old tools are equally artifacts, without being ancient. Excavated from places where they had been lost, finding them reveals a clue to some past human activity. I have broadened my interpretation of an artifact to include architectural ruins because, while the scale is larger, to me, they convey the same sense of material remains from past use.

Photos > Kytherian Art

submitted by KCA Admin on 25.04.2015

"Olive, the blessed tree" - exhibition poster

The poster designed for the exhibition "Olive, the blessed tree" by Michalis Petropoulos.

Photos > Kytherian Art

submitted by Kytherian Art World on 01.05.2015

Alexia Psaltis' artwork Subsumed, on display at the Art Gallery of NSW

By HELEN GREGORY

Newcastle Herald

February 10th, 2015.

Reproduced with permission of The Newcastle Herald ©Copyright 2015


Alexia is the daughter of Peter and Sheri Psaltis, who live in Newcastle, and granddaughter of the late George Psaltis and Alexandra Psaltis (nee, Feros), of Gilgandra, and later Earlwood.

ALEXIA Psaltis’ hair-raising expeditions squeezing through fences to photograph abandoned industrial sites have paid off, culminating in an eye-catching piece selected to hang in the Art Gallery of NSW.

The 2014 dux of Hunter School of the Performing Arts is the woman behind Subsumed, which has been selected for Artexpress, a showcase of the best works of art completed by NSW students as part of last year’s Higher School Certificate.

Of the 219 works selected for exhibitions in galleries across the state, only 37 have been selected for inclusion in the exclusive Art Gallery of NSW exhibit.

‘‘When I heard, I was jumping around in excitement, it was the best feeling,’’ Ms Psaltis said.

‘‘Out of all of my HSC achievements, that’s the one that really stood out to me.’’

Ms Psaltis’ work explores the paradox of Newcastle’s heavy industry sitting alongside its pristine coast.

It comprises six surrealistic portraits of female figures, representing Mother Nature, being consumed by industrial structures, objects and landscapes that convey destruction and invasion.

Each portrait includes layers of hundreds of photos she captured from both active and abandoned industrial sites including Kooragang Island, Cockatoo Island and around Hexham and Maitland.

‘‘I visited quite a few deserted and unused machinery yards where there was equipment that had rusted and been left to rot,’’ she said.

‘‘It was a bit scary going into the abandoned sites, but I just squeezed through holes in fences.

‘‘The portraits represent how physical, spiritual and psychological identity is threatened by industrialisation, which removes individual human inspiration and imagination.

‘‘We now face a future of surreal, stunted landscapes.’’

Ms Psaltis also completed major works in English Extension II, Music and Society and Culture and was named on the All-round Achievers list for receiving marks in the highest band possible for 10 or more units.

She began her combined law and arts degree at the University of Newcastle in February 2015.

Artexpress at the Art Gallery of NSW will open to the public from Thursday.

The remaining works selected for Artexpress will be on display in venues across the state throughout the remainder of the year.

The exhibition will come to Maitland Regional Art Gallery between September 11 and November 1.

Rationale of the artwork

Alexia Psaltis
Hunter School of the Performing Arts

SUBSUMED

Photomeita
Prints to Breathing Colour Velvet paper

Subsumed is a series of portraits representing the threat to physical, spiritual and psychological identity from rampant industrialisation. The portraits identify how the dominance of industry removes individual human inspiration and imagination. We face a future of surreal, stunted landscapes populated by impaired humanity, symbolised by the replacement of human physicality with machinery. I photographed all the images of industrial structures, objects and landscapes that convey destruction and invasion. I layered these eclectic images with the human portraits to represent the unchecked, pervasive presence of industrial processes in our lives. We are consumed by industry and its detritus.

What is ArtExpress?

ARTEXPRESS is an annual exhibition of artworks created by students from government and non-government schools for the Higher School Certificate Examination in Visual Arts. The works demonstrate exceptional quality across a broad range of subject matter, approaches, styles and media including painting, photography, drawing, printmaking, sculpture, documented forms, textiles and fibre, ceramics, digital animation, film and video, and collections of works.

ARTEXPRESS represents the high standards and diversity achieved by Year 12 Visual Arts students in New South Wales schools.

The continued excellence of the annual ARTEXPRESS exhibition is the outcome of a rigorous Visual Arts curriculum that builds on study from Kindergarten through to Year 12.

Visual Arts is part of the core curriculum in primary school and junior high school and a popular elective for the Higher School Certificate examination.

Student assessment in Visual Arts for the Higher School Certificate is based on submission of a Body of Work plus a written examination. Each students develops their submission through a process, recorded in a Visual Arts Process Diary, which reflects the problem-solving approach of the practising artist.

Equally important especially at senior level, is critical study and art history which plays a crucial role in informing the artworks produced by students.

The works chosen for ARTEXPRESS are a representative selection from over 12,000 examination submissions and reflect not only the talent of the individual students, but also the strength of the curriculum and excellence of Visual Arts teaching in New South Wales schools.

ARTEXPRESS is shown at 9 metropolitan and regional venues in NSW.

Photos > Kytherian Art

submitted by Kytherian Art World on 01.05.2015

Subsumed. By Alexis Psaltis. The Rationale of the art work

By HELEN GREGORY

Newcastle Herald

February 10th, 2015.

Reproduced with permission of The Newcastle Herald ©Copyright 2015


Alexia is the daughter of Peter and Sheri Psaltis, who live in Newcastle, and granddaughter of the late George Psaltis and Alexandra Psaltis (nee, Feros), of Gilgandra, and later Earlwood.

ALEXIA Psaltis’ hair-raising expeditions squeezing through fences to photograph abandoned industrial sites have paid off, culminating in an eye-catching piece selected to hang in the Art Gallery of NSW.

The 2014 dux of Hunter School of the Performing Arts is the woman behind Subsumed, which has been selected for Artexpress, a showcase of the best works of art completed by NSW students as part of last year’s Higher School Certificate.

Of the 219 works selected for exhibitions in galleries across the state, only 37 have been selected for inclusion in the exclusive Art Gallery of NSW exhibit.

‘‘When I heard, I was jumping around in excitement, it was the best feeling,’’ Ms Psaltis said.

‘‘Out of all of my HSC achievements, that’s the one that really stood out to me.’’

Ms Psaltis’ work explores the paradox of Newcastle’s heavy industry sitting alongside its pristine coast.

It comprises six surrealistic portraits of female figures, representing Mother Nature, being consumed by industrial structures, objects and landscapes that convey destruction and invasion.

Each portrait includes layers of hundreds of photos she captured from both active and abandoned industrial sites including Kooragang Island, Cockatoo Island and around Hexham and Maitland.

‘‘I visited quite a few deserted and unused machinery yards where there was equipment that had rusted and been left to rot,’’ she said.

‘‘It was a bit scary going into the abandoned sites, but I just squeezed through holes in fences.

‘‘The portraits represent how physical, spiritual and psychological identity is threatened by industrialisation, which removes individual human inspiration and imagination.

‘‘We now face a future of surreal, stunted landscapes.’’

Ms Psaltis also completed major works in English Extension II, Music and Society and Culture and was named on the All-round Achievers list for receiving marks in the highest band possible for 10 or more units.

She began her combined law and arts degree at the University of Newcastle in February 2015.

Artexpress at the Art Gallery of NSW will open to the public from Thursday.

The remaining works selected for Artexpress will be on display in venues across the state throughout the remainder of the year.

The exhibition will come to Maitland Regional Art Gallery between September 11 and November 1.

Rationale of the artwork

Alexia Psaltis
Hunter School of the Performing Arts

SUBSUMED

Photomeita
Prints to Breathing Colour Velvet paper

Subsumed is a series of portraits representing the threat to physical, spiritual and psychological identity from rampant industrialisation. The portraits identify how the dominance of industry removes individual human inspiration and imagination. We face a future of surreal, stunted landscapes populated by impaired humanity, symbolised by the replacement of human physicality with machinery. I photographed all the images of industrial structures, objects and landscapes that convey destruction and invasion. I layered these eclectic images with the human portraits to represent the unchecked, pervasive presence of industrial processes in our lives. We are consumed by industry and its detritus.

What is ArtExpress?

ARTEXPRESS is an annual exhibition of artworks created by students from government and non-government schools for the Higher School Certificate Examination in Visual Arts. The works demonstrate exceptional quality across a broad range of subject matter, approaches, styles and media including painting, photography, drawing, printmaking, sculpture, documented forms, textiles and fibre, ceramics, digital animation, film and video, and collections of works.

ARTEXPRESS represents the high standards and diversity achieved by Year 12 Visual Arts students in New South Wales schools.

The continued excellence of the annual ARTEXPRESS exhibition is the outcome of a rigorous Visual Arts curriculum that builds on study from Kindergarten through to Year 12.

Visual Arts is part of the core curriculum in primary school and junior high school and a popular elective for the Higher School Certificate examination.

Student assessment in Visual Arts for the Higher School Certificate is based on submission of a Body of Work plus a written examination. Each students develops their submission through a process, recorded in a Visual Arts Process Diary, which reflects the problem-solving approach of the practising artist.

Equally important especially at senior level, is critical study and art history which plays a crucial role in informing the artworks produced by students.

The works chosen for ARTEXPRESS are a representative selection from over 12,000 examination submissions and reflect not only the talent of the individual students, but also the strength of the curriculum and excellence of Visual Arts teaching in New South Wales schools.

ARTEXPRESS is shown at 9 metropolitan and regional venues in NSW.

Photos > Kytherian Art

submitted by Kytherian Art World on 01.05.2015

Art work by Alexia Psaltis

Art student gets subsumed

By HELEN GREGORY

Newcastle Herald

February 10th, 2015

Reproduced with permission of The Newcastle Herald©Copyright 2015

Alexia is the daughter of Peter and Sheri Psaltis, who live in Newcastle, and granddaughter of the late George Psaltis and Alexandra Psaltis (nee, Feros), of Gilgandra, and later Earlwood.

ALEXIA Psaltis’ hair-raising expeditions squeezing through fences to photograph abandoned industrial sites have paid off, culminating in an eye-catching piece selected to hang in the Art Gallery of NSW.

The 2014 dux of Hunter School of the Performing Arts is the woman behind Subsumed, which has been selected for Artexpress, a showcase of the best works of art completed by NSW students as part of last year’s Higher School Certificate.

Of the 219 works selected for exhibitions in galleries across the state, only 37 have been selected for inclusion in the exclusive Art Gallery of NSW exhibit.

‘‘When I heard, I was jumping around in excitement, it was the best feeling,’’ Ms Psaltis said.

‘‘Out of all of my HSC achievements, that’s the one that really stood out to me.’’

Ms Psaltis’ work explores the paradox of Newcastle’s heavy industry sitting alongside its pristine coast.

It comprises six surrealistic portraits of female figures, representing Mother Nature, being consumed by industrial structures, objects and landscapes that convey destruction and invasion.

Each portrait includes layers of hundreds of photos she captured from both active and abandoned industrial sites including Kooragang Island, Cockatoo Island and around Hexham and Maitland.

‘‘I visited quite a few deserted and unused machinery yards where there was equipment that had rusted and been left to rot,’’ she said.

‘‘It was a bit scary going into the abandoned sites, but I just squeezed through holes in fences.

‘‘The portraits represent how physical, spiritual and psychological identity is threatened by industrialisation, which removes individual human inspiration and imagination.

‘‘We now face a future of surreal, stunted landscapes.’’

Ms Psaltis also completed major works in English Extension II, Music and Society and Culture and was named on the All-round Achievers list for receiving marks in the highest band possible for 10 or more units.

She began her combined law and arts degree at the University of Newcastle in February 2015.

Artexpress at the Art Gallery of NSW will open to the public from Thursday.

The remaining works selected for Artexpress will be on display in venues across the state throughout the remainder of the year.

The exhibition will come to Maitland Regional Art Gallery between September 11 and November 1.

Rationale of the artwork

Alexia Psaltis
Hunter School of the Performing Arts

SUBSUMED

Photomeita
Prints to Breathing Colour Velvet paper

Subsumed is a series of portraits representing the threat to physical, spiritual and psychological identity from rampant industrialisation. The portraits identify how the dominance of industry removes individual human inspiration and imagination. We face a future of surreal, stunted landscapes populated by impaired humanity, symbolised by the replacement of human physicality with machinery. I photographed all the images of industrial structures, objects and landscapes that convey destruction and invasion. I layered these eclectic images with the human portraits to represent the unchecked, pervasive presence of industrial processes in our lives. We are consumed by industry and its detritus.

What is ArtExpress?

ARTEXPRESS is an annual exhibition of artworks created by students from government and non-government schools for the Higher School Certificate Examination in Visual Arts. The works demonstrate exceptional quality across a broad range of subject matter, approaches, styles and media including painting, photography, drawing, printmaking, sculpture, documented forms, textiles and fibre, ceramics, digital animation, film and video, and collections of works.

ARTEXPRESS represents the high standards and diversity achieved by Year 12 Visual Arts students in New South Wales schools.

The continued excellence of the annual ARTEXPRESS exhibition is the outcome of a rigorous Visual Arts curriculum that builds on study from Kindergarten through to Year 12.

Visual Arts is part of the core curriculum in primary school and junior high school and a popular elective for the Higher School Certificate examination.

Student assessment in Visual Arts for the Higher School Certificate is based on submission of a Body of Work plus a written examination. Each students develops their submission through a process, recorded in a Visual Arts Process Diary, which reflects the problem-solving approach of the practising artist.

Equally important especially at senior level, is critical study and art history which plays a crucial role in informing the artworks produced by students.

The works chosen for ARTEXPRESS are a representative selection from over 12,000 examination submissions and reflect not only the talent of the individual students, but also the strength of the curriculum and excellence of Visual Arts teaching in New South Wales schools.

ARTEXPRESS is shown at 9 metropolitan and regional venues in NSW.

Photos > Kytherian Art

submitted by Kytherian Art World on 01.05.2015

Art work by Alexia Psaltis

Art student gets subsumed

By HELEN GREGORY

Newcastle Herald

February 10th, 2015

- Reproduced with permission of The Newcastle Herald©Copyright 2015
.

Alexia is the daughter of Peter and Sheri Psaltis, who live in Newcastle, and granddaughter of the late George Psaltis and Alexandra Psaltis (nee, Feros), of Gilgandra, and later Earlwood.

ALEXIA Psaltis’ hair-raising expeditions squeezing through fences to photograph abandoned industrial sites have paid off, culminating in an eye-catching piece selected to hang in the Art Gallery of NSW.

The 2014 dux of Hunter School of the Performing Arts is the woman behind Subsumed, which has been selected for Artexpress, a showcase of the best works of art completed by NSW students as part of last year’s Higher School Certificate.

Of the 219 works selected for exhibitions in galleries across the state, only 37 have been selected for inclusion in the exclusive Art Gallery of NSW exhibit.

‘‘When I heard, I was jumping around in excitement, it was the best feeling,’’ Ms Psaltis said.

‘‘Out of all of my HSC achievements, that’s the one that really stood out to me.’’

Ms Psaltis’ work explores the paradox of Newcastle’s heavy industry sitting alongside its pristine coast.

It comprises six surrealistic portraits of female figures, representing Mother Nature, being consumed by industrial structures, objects and landscapes that convey destruction and invasion.

Each portrait includes layers of hundreds of photos she captured from both active and abandoned industrial sites including Kooragang Island, Cockatoo Island and around Hexham and Maitland.

‘‘I visited quite a few deserted and unused machinery yards where there was equipment that had rusted and been left to rot,’’ she said.

‘‘It was a bit scary going into the abandoned sites, but I just squeezed through holes in fences.

‘‘The portraits represent how physical, spiritual and psychological identity is threatened by industrialisation, which removes individual human inspiration and imagination.

‘‘We now face a future of surreal, stunted landscapes.’’

Ms Psaltis also completed major works in English Extension II, Music and Society and Culture and was named on the All-round Achievers list for receiving marks in the highest band possible for 10 or more units.

She began her combined law and arts degree at the University of Newcastle in February 2015.

Artexpress at the Art Gallery of NSW will open to the public from Thursday.

The remaining works selected for Artexpress will be on display in venues across the state throughout the remainder of the year.

The exhibition will come to Maitland Regional Art Gallery between September 11 and November 1.

Rationale of the artwork

Alexia Psaltis
Hunter School of the Performing Arts

SUBSUMED

Photomeita
Prints to Breathing Colour Velvet paper

Subsumed is a series of portraits representing the threat to physical, spiritual and psychological identity from rampant industrialisation. The portraits identify how the dominance of industry removes individual human inspiration and imagination. We face a future of surreal, stunted landscapes populated by impaired humanity, symbolised by the replacement of human physicality with machinery. I photographed all the images of industrial structures, objects and landscapes that convey destruction and invasion. I layered these eclectic images with the human portraits to represent the unchecked, pervasive presence of industrial processes in our lives. We are consumed by industry and its detritus.

What is ArtExpress?

ARTEXPRESS is an annual exhibition of artworks created by students from government and non-government schools for the Higher School Certificate Examination in Visual Arts. The works demonstrate exceptional quality across a broad range of subject matter, approaches, styles and media including painting, photography, drawing, printmaking, sculpture, documented forms, textiles and fibre, ceramics, digital animation, film and video, and collections of works.

ARTEXPRESS represents the high standards and diversity achieved by Year 12 Visual Arts students in New South Wales schools.

The continued excellence of the annual ARTEXPRESS exhibition is the outcome of a rigorous Visual Arts curriculum that builds on study from Kindergarten through to Year 12.

Visual Arts is part of the core curriculum in primary school and junior high school and a popular elective for the Higher School Certificate examination.

Student assessment in Visual Arts for the Higher School Certificate is based on submission of a Body of Work plus a written examination. Each students develops their submission through a process, recorded in a Visual Arts Process Diary, which reflects the problem-solving approach of the practising artist.

Equally important especially at senior level, is critical study and art history which plays a crucial role in informing the artworks produced by students.

The works chosen for ARTEXPRESS are a representative selection from over 12,000 examination submissions and reflect not only the talent of the individual students, but also the strength of the curriculum and excellence of Visual Arts teaching in New South Wales schools.

ARTEXPRESS is shown at 9 metropolitan and regional venues in NSW.

Photos > Kytherian Art

submitted by Kytherian Art World on 01.05.2015

Artwork by Alexia Psaltis

Art student gets Subsumed

By HELEN GREGORY

Newcastle Herald

February 10th, 2015.

Reproduced with permission of The Newcastle Herald ©Copyright 2015


Alexia is the daughter of Peter and Sheri Psaltis, who live in Newcastle, and granddaughter of the late George Psaltis and Alexandra Psaltis (nee, Feros), of Gilgandra, and later Earlwood.

ALEXIA Psaltis’ hair-raising expeditions squeezing through fences to photograph abandoned industrial sites have paid off, culminating in an eye-catching piece selected to hang in the Art Gallery of NSW.

The 2014 dux of Hunter School of the Performing Arts is the woman behind Subsumed, which has been selected for Artexpress, a showcase of the best works of art completed by NSW students as part of last year’s Higher School Certificate.

Of the 219 works selected for exhibitions in galleries across the state, only 37 have been selected for inclusion in the exclusive Art Gallery of NSW exhibit.

‘‘When I heard, I was jumping around in excitement, it was the best feeling,’’ Ms Psaltis said.

‘‘Out of all of my HSC achievements, that’s the one that really stood out to me.’’

Ms Psaltis’ work explores the paradox of Newcastle’s heavy industry sitting alongside its pristine coast.

It comprises six surrealistic portraits of female figures, representing Mother Nature, being consumed by industrial structures, objects and landscapes that convey destruction and invasion.

Each portrait includes layers of hundreds of photos she captured from both active and abandoned industrial sites including Kooragang Island, Cockatoo Island and around Hexham and Maitland.

‘‘I visited quite a few deserted and unused machinery yards where there was equipment that had rusted and been left to rot,’’ she said.

‘‘It was a bit scary going into the abandoned sites, but I just squeezed through holes in fences.

‘‘The portraits represent how physical, spiritual and psychological identity is threatened by industrialisation, which removes individual human inspiration and imagination.

‘‘We now face a future of surreal, stunted landscapes.’’

Ms Psaltis also completed major works in English Extension II, Music and Society and Culture and was named on the All-round Achievers list for receiving marks in the highest band possible for 10 or more units.

She began her combined law and arts degree at the University of Newcastle in February 2015.

Artexpress at the Art Gallery of NSW will open to the public from Thursday.

The remaining works selected for Artexpress will be on display in venues across the state throughout the remainder of the year.

The exhibition will come to Maitland Regional Art Gallery between September 11 and November 1.

Rationale of the artwork

Alexia Psaltis
Hunter School of the Performing Arts

SUBSUMED

Photomedia
Prints to Breathing Colour Velvet paper

Subsumed is a series of portraits representing the threat to physical, spiritual and psychological identity from rampant industrialisation. The portraits identify how the dominance of industry removes individual human inspiration and imagination. We face a future of surreal, stunted landscapes populated by impaired humanity, symbolised by the replacement of human physicality with machinery. I photographed all the images of industrial structures, objects and landscapes that convey destruction and invasion. I layered these eclectic images with the human portraits to represent the unchecked, pervasive presence of industrial processes in our lives. We are consumed by industry and its detritus.

What is ArtExpress?

ARTEXPRESS is an annual exhibition of artworks created by students from government and non-government schools for the Higher School Certificate Examination in Visual Arts. The works demonstrate exceptional quality across a broad range of subject matter, approaches, styles and media including painting, photography, drawing, printmaking, sculpture, documented forms, textiles and fibre, ceramics, digital animation, film and video, and collections of works.

ARTEXPRESS represents the high standards and diversity achieved by Year 12 Visual Arts students in New South Wales schools.

The continued excellence of the annual ARTEXPRESS exhibition is the outcome of a rigorous Visual Arts curriculum that builds on study from Kindergarten through to Year 12.

Visual Arts is part of the core curriculum in primary school and junior high school and a popular elective for the Higher School Certificate examination.

Student assessment in Visual Arts for the Higher School Certificate is based on submission of a Body of Work plus a written examination. Each students develops their submission through a process, recorded in a Visual Arts Process Diary, which reflects the problem-solving approach of the practising artist.

Equally important especially at senior level, is critical study and art history which plays a crucial role in informing the artworks produced by students.

The works chosen for ARTEXPRESS are a representative selection from over 12,000 examination submissions and reflect not only the talent of the individual students, but also the strength of the curriculum and excellence of Visual Arts teaching in New South Wales schools.

ARTEXPRESS is shown at 9 metropolitan and regional venues in NSW.

Photos > Kytherian Art

submitted by Kytherian Art World on 01.05.2015

Art work by Alexia Psaltis

Art student gets Subsumed

By HELEN GREGORY

Newcastle Herald

February 10th, 2015.

Reproduced with permission of The Newcastle Herald ©Copyright 2015


[[picture:"Alexia Psaltis 1.jpg" ID:22808]]

Alexia is the daughter of Peter and Sheri Psaltis, who live in Newcastle, and granddaughter of the late George Psaltis and Alexandra Psaltis (nee, Feros), of Gilgandra, and later Earlwood.

ALEXIA Psaltis’ hair-raising expeditions squeezing through fences to photograph abandoned industrial sites have paid off, culminating in an eye-catching piece selected to hang in the Art Gallery of NSW.

The 2014 dux of Hunter School of the Performing Arts is the woman behind Subsumed, which has been selected for Artexpress, a showcase of the best works of art completed by NSW students as part of last year’s Higher School Certificate.

Of the 219 works selected for exhibitions in galleries across the state, only 37 have been selected for inclusion in the exclusive Art Gallery of NSW exhibit.

‘‘When I heard, I was jumping around in excitement, it was the best feeling,’’ Ms Psaltis said.

‘‘Out of all of my HSC achievements, that’s the one that really stood out to me.’’

Ms Psaltis’ work explores the paradox of Newcastle’s heavy industry sitting alongside its pristine coast.

It comprises six surrealistic portraits of female figures, representing Mother Nature, being consumed by industrial structures, objects and landscapes that convey destruction and invasion.

Each portrait includes layers of hundreds of photos she captured from both active and abandoned industrial sites including Kooragang Island, Cockatoo Island and around Hexham and Maitland.

‘‘I visited quite a few deserted and unused machinery yards where there was equipment that had rusted and been left to rot,’’ she said.

‘‘It was a bit scary going into the abandoned sites, but I just squeezed through holes in fences.

‘‘The portraits represent how physical, spiritual and psychological identity is threatened by industrialisation, which removes individual human inspiration and imagination.

‘‘We now face a future of surreal, stunted landscapes.’’

Ms Psaltis also completed major works in English Extension II, Music and Society and Culture and was named on the All-round Achievers list for receiving marks in the highest band possible for 10 or more units.

She began her combined law and arts degree at the University of Newcastle in February 2015.

Artexpress at the Art Gallery of NSW will open to the public from Thursday.

The remaining works selected for Artexpress will be on display in venues across the state throughout the remainder of the year.

The exhibition will come to Maitland Regional Art Gallery between September 11 and November 1.

Rationale of the artwork

Alexia Psaltis
Hunter School of the Performing Arts

SUBSUMED

Photomedia
Prints to Breathing Colour Velvet paper

Subsumed is a series of portraits representing the threat to physical, spiritual and psychological identity from rampant industrialisation. The portraits identify how the dominance of industry removes individual human inspiration and imagination. We face a future of surreal, stunted landscapes populated by impaired humanity, symbolised by the replacement of human physicality with machinery. I photographed all the images of industrial structures, objects and landscapes that convey destruction and invasion. I layered these eclectic images with the human portraits to represent the unchecked, pervasive presence of industrial processes in our lives. We are consumed by industry and its detritus.

What is ArtExpress?

ARTEXPRESS is an annual exhibition of artworks created by students from government and non-government schools for the Higher School Certificate Examination in Visual Arts. The works demonstrate exceptional quality across a broad range of subject matter, approaches, styles and media including painting, photography, drawing, printmaking, sculpture, documented forms, textiles and fibre, ceramics, digital animation, film and video, and collections of works.

ARTEXPRESS represents the high standards and diversity achieved by Year 12 Visual Arts students in New South Wales schools.

The continued excellence of the annual ARTEXPRESS exhibition is the outcome of a rigorous Visual Arts curriculum that builds on study from Kindergarten through to Year 12.

Visual Arts is part of the core curriculum in primary school and junior high school and a popular elective for the Higher School Certificate examination.

Student assessment in Visual Arts for the Higher School Certificate is based on submission of a Body of Work plus a written examination. Each students develops their submission through a process, recorded in a Visual Arts Process Diary, which reflects the problem-solving approach of the practising artist.

Equally important especially at senior level, is critical study and art history which plays a crucial role in informing the artworks produced by students.

The works chosen for ARTEXPRESS are a representative selection from over 12,000 examination submissions and reflect not only the talent of the individual students, but also the strength of the curriculum and excellence of Visual Arts teaching in New South Wales schools.

ARTEXPRESS is shown at 9 metropolitan and regional venues in NSW.

Photos > Kytherian Art

submitted by Lafcadio Hearn Files on 15.03.2014

The symbol chosen by Tety Solou to designate her work,

in translating 3 books by Lafcadio Hearn (2014). The symbol appears on the cover of each book.

[This is the first time in history that entire Lafacdio Hearn books have been translated, with a view to having them printed and published]

Μεταφράζοντας τον Λευκάδιο Χερν στα ελληνικά ギリシャ語訳ラフカディオ・ハーン

Τέτη Σώλου: Οι μεταφράσεις μου των έργων του Λευκάδιου Χερν και οι σημειώσεις μου σχετικά με το έργο και τη ζωή του.

Η ιστορία ενός συμβόλου


Πριν από πολλά χρόνια η Άννα μου είχε χαρίσει ένα κόσμημά της. Μια καρφίτσα από αλπακά. Η αξία του κοσμήματος είναι μικρή. Η «από διαθέσεως αξία», που λένε τα νομικά βιβλία είναι μεγάλη, μια και το δώρο είναι από τη γιαγιά μου που κι εκείνης της το είχε δώσει η προγιαγιά μου. Οικογενειακό κειμήλιο μ' άλλα λόγια.

H καρφίτσα της γιαγιάς. Xρυσάνθεμο Kαρφίτσα

Η συναισθηματική του αξία έγινε ακόμα πιο μεγάλη, όταν συνάντησα την ίδια καρφίτσα σε μια παλιά φωτογραφία της Αλεξάνδρας Παπαδοπούλου. Ναι, ναι της πρώτης Ελληνίδας διηγηματογράφου, που την αγαπώ πολύ και που παρ' όλο που έζησε λίγους μήνες στη Θεσσαλονίκη, εγώ την έχω συνδέσει με την αγαπημένη μου πόλη. Το βιβλίο που έχω γράψει για τη Θεσσαλονίκη ξεκίνησε από ένα μικρό κείμενό της.

Αλεξάνδρα Παπαδοπούλου

Στην μοναδική φωτογραφία της που σώζεται, η Αλεξάνδρα Παπαδοπούλου φοράει μια καρφίτσα ίδια, ολόιδια με το δώρο της γιαγιάς. Τυχαίο;

Ο Λευκάδιος Χερν και η Ιαπωνία που γνώρισα μέσα από τα γραπτά του μ' έφεραν μπροστά στο ιτσιμοντζιγκινού. Στο χρυσάνθεμο που είναι το σύμβολο του αυτοκράτορα. Συνδέθηκε με την αυτοκρατορική οικογένεια εξ αιτίας της ομοιότητάς του με τον ήλιο.

Xρυσάνθεμο Iαπωνία

Στην ιαπωνική μυθολογία η θεά του ήλιου, η Αματεράσου, έφερε στον κόσμο τον Τζιμμού, τον πρώτο αυτοκράτορα της Ιαπωνίας. Το αυτοκρατορικό έμβλημα παρουσιάζει ένα χρυσό χρυσάνθεμο με δεκαέξι πέταλα, γνωστό ως ιτσιμοντζιγκινού.

Τζιμμού, ο πρώτος αυτοκράτορας της Ιαπωνίας

Το χρυσάνθεμο, που μοιάζει με τον ήλιο που τόσο λαμπερός φαίνεται πίσω από τον Τζιμμού, βρήκα πως είναι ένα παγκόσμιο σύμβολο. Ιάπωνες, Ασσσύριοι, Σουμέριοι, Αιγύπτιοι ως το Μεξικό είχαν συγκινηθεί από αυτό το σύμβολο.
Το ίδιο και οι αρχαίοι Έλληνες. Από το παλάτι του Μίνωα στην Κνωσσό μέχρι τον τάφο του Φιλίππου συναντάμε αυτόν τον συνδυασμό του παντοδύναμου ήλιου με το λουλούδι σε πλήρη άνθιση αποτυπωμένο σε τοιχογραφίες, αγγεία, λάρνακες, αγάλματα.

Ψάχνοντας χτες το βράδυ τα χαρτιά μου σύνδεσα όλες αυτές τις πληροφορίες κι έκανα συνειρμούς που δεν είχα κάνει πρωτύτερα. Η καρφίτσα της γιαγιάς και της Αλεξάνδρας Παπαδοπούλου, το λαμπερό σύμβολο της χώρας του Ανατέλλοντος Ήλιου και της Αρχαίας Ελλάδας από την Κρήτη μέχρι τη Μακεδονία... και όχι μόνο.

Το σήμα της σειράς των έργων του Λευκάδιου Χερν σε μετάφραση Τέτης Σώλου

Είναι ταιριαστό να συνοδεύει τη σειρά των έργων του Λευκάδιου Χερν, του οικουμενικού ανθρώπου με το ανοιχτό μυαλό, ένα οικουμενικό σύμβολο πνευματικής δύναμης και ακμής. Ο ίδιος ο Λευκάδιος δεν γνώρισε παρακμή. Ο θάνατος τον βρήκε στα 54 χρόνια του έχοντας αφήσει σπουδαίο συγγραφικό έργο κι έχοντας ενδεχομένως άλλα τόσα να γράψει.

Το εξώφυλλο του Κοττό

Photos > Kytherian Art

submitted by Lafcadio Hearn Files on 15.03.2014

Grandmothers brooch. A visual part of the story about ...

Translating (3 books) by Lafcadio Hearn into Greek

[This is the first time in history that entire Lafacdio Hearn books have been translated, with a view to having them printed and published]

Μεταφράζοντας τον Λευκάδιο Χερν στα ελληνικά ギリシャ語訳ラフカディオ・ハーン

Τέτη Σώλου: Οι μεταφράσεις μου των έργων του Λευκάδιου Χερν και οι σημειώσεις μου σχετικά με το έργο και τη ζωή του.

Η ιστορία ενός συμβόλου


Πριν από πολλά χρόνια η Άννα μου είχε χαρίσει ένα κόσμημά της. Μια καρφίτσα από αλπακά. Η αξία του κοσμήματος είναι μικρή. Η «από διαθέσεως αξία», που λένε τα νομικά βιβλία είναι μεγάλη, μια και το δώρο είναι από τη γιαγιά μου που κι εκείνης της το είχε δώσει η προγιαγιά μου. Οικογενειακό κειμήλιο μ' άλλα λόγια.

H καρφίτσα της γιαγιάς. Xρυσάνθεμο Kαρφίτσα

Η συναισθηματική του αξία έγινε ακόμα πιο μεγάλη, όταν συνάντησα την ίδια καρφίτσα σε μια παλιά φωτογραφία της Αλεξάνδρας Παπαδοπούλου. Ναι, ναι της πρώτης Ελληνίδας διηγηματογράφου, που την αγαπώ πολύ και που παρ' όλο που έζησε λίγους μήνες στη Θεσσαλονίκη, εγώ την έχω συνδέσει με την αγαπημένη μου πόλη. Το βιβλίο που έχω γράψει για τη Θεσσαλονίκη ξεκίνησε από ένα μικρό κείμενό της.

Αλεξάνδρα Παπαδοπούλου

Στην μοναδική φωτογραφία της που σώζεται, η Αλεξάνδρα Παπαδοπούλου φοράει μια καρφίτσα ίδια, ολόιδια με το δώρο της γιαγιάς. Τυχαίο;

Ο Λευκάδιος Χερν και η Ιαπωνία που γνώρισα μέσα από τα γραπτά του μ' έφεραν μπροστά στο ιτσιμοντζιγκινού. Στο χρυσάνθεμο που είναι το σύμβολο του αυτοκράτορα. Συνδέθηκε με την αυτοκρατορική οικογένεια εξ αιτίας της ομοιότητάς του με τον ήλιο.

Xρυσάνθεμο Iαπωνία

Στην ιαπωνική μυθολογία η θεά του ήλιου, η Αματεράσου, έφερε στον κόσμο τον Τζιμμού, τον πρώτο αυτοκράτορα της Ιαπωνίας. Το αυτοκρατορικό έμβλημα παρουσιάζει ένα χρυσό χρυσάνθεμο με δεκαέξι πέταλα, γνωστό ως ιτσιμοντζιγκινού.

Τζιμμού, ο πρώτος αυτοκράτορας της Ιαπωνίας

Το χρυσάνθεμο, που μοιάζει με τον ήλιο που τόσο λαμπερός φαίνεται πίσω από τον Τζιμμού, βρήκα πως είναι ένα παγκόσμιο σύμβολο. Ιάπωνες, Ασσσύριοι, Σουμέριοι, Αιγύπτιοι ως το Μεξικό είχαν συγκινηθεί από αυτό το σύμβολο.
Το ίδιο και οι αρχαίοι Έλληνες. Από το παλάτι του Μίνωα στην Κνωσσό μέχρι τον τάφο του Φιλίππου συναντάμε αυτόν τον συνδυασμό του παντοδύναμου ήλιου με το λουλούδι σε πλήρη άνθιση αποτυπωμένο σε τοιχογραφίες, αγγεία, λάρνακες, αγάλματα.

Ψάχνοντας χτες το βράδυ τα χαρτιά μου σύνδεσα όλες αυτές τις πληροφορίες κι έκανα συνειρμούς που δεν είχα κάνει πρωτύτερα. Η καρφίτσα της γιαγιάς και της Αλεξάνδρας Παπαδοπούλου, το λαμπερό σύμβολο της χώρας του Ανατέλλοντος Ήλιου και της Αρχαίας Ελλάδας από την Κρήτη μέχρι τη Μακεδονία... και όχι μόνο.

Το σήμα της σειράς των έργων του Λευκάδιου Χερν σε μετάφραση Τέτης Σώλου

Είναι ταιριαστό να συνοδεύει τη σειρά των έργων του Λευκάδιου Χερν, του οικουμενικού ανθρώπου με το ανοιχτό μυαλό, ένα οικουμενικό σύμβολο πνευματικής δύναμης και ακμής. Ο ίδιος ο Λευκάδιος δεν γνώρισε παρακμή. Ο θάνατος τον βρήκε στα 54 χρόνια του έχοντας αφήσει σπουδαίο συγγραφικό έργο κι έχοντας ενδεχομένως άλλα τόσα να γράψει.

Το εξώφυλλο του Κοττό

Photos > Kytherian Art

submitted by Australian Financial Review on 01.10.2013

Gallery in an art museum on the island of Naoshima in Japan

The Australian Financial Review Magazine. pp. 48-52.

October Magazine. Friday 27th October, 2013

Article: To Draw is to See

Drawing is a crucial tool in an architect’s kit, but it’s use goes way beyond drafting building plans. Six (prominent Australian) architects tell Katrina Strickland when and where they sketch – and how much it means to them.

One of the 6 Australian architects chosen to comment was Kytherian architect.....

Eva-Marie Prineas

Architect Prineas


Once I began studying architecture, the way I sketched changed. I sketch in the office and also try to sketch when we go away, although with two children aged three and five it is easier when I travel alone. I probably don’t sketch enough in meetings because l'm self-conscious. I’m not confident enough to sketch in front of a client when the idea is not yet fully formed. But I have seen how sketching can completely seduce a client - some architects are masters.

My father is from the Greek island of Kythera, which is south of the Peloponnese and north of Crete. When l was at university I started working on a conservation plan for our family house, which is at the top of the island in a village called Mitata.

When you go there it is like stepping back into the 1940’s. We got married there and until we had children, travelled there every summer. Our neighbour in Mitata, who is also an architect, organised a week of tango one summer. This sketch is of the master classes we would have in the morning in the old school house at the main square.

The image above is from the island of Naoshima in Japan, where there are a number of art museums including Chichu.

To enter one of the galleries here, you have to remove your shoes and put on little slippers. You go through a dark space first, then emerge into a diffusely lit white room. Three significant Monet paintings appear to float on each of the walls. I made this sketch from memory afterwards. I was taken by the small moves the architect made, which completely changed the way I perceived the paintings.

Photos > Kytherian Art

submitted by Lafcadio Hearn Files on 28.04.2013

The Spirit of Hermes sculpture at the Art Forum Gallery in Thessaloniki

The sculpture is 120 cm's high.

How did Masaaki become so involved in Greek culture?

Masaaki was introduced to Greek culture, and the work of Lacadio Hearn, through Art Collector, Takis Efsathiou.

Masaaki first met Lafcadio Hearn's grandson, Bon Koizumi at the Matsue Muesum, in Japan on July 5th 1996.

Takis Efstathiou organized Masaaki's first one person exhibition at the gallery Cyclades Antiebs in France in1995. At this time Masaaki travelled to Greece for the first time.

He visited Takis holiday house at Coulf, and then travelled to Lefkatha, Delfi and Athens. This visit had a profound infuence on his life and art, and began his involvement with Lafcadio Hearn, Greek culture, and Greece.

Takis Efstathiou then visited Japan for the first time. Together, in 1996 they organsised the Theodoros Stamos exhibition at the Hiro Gallery in Tokyo. Stamos was very keen to visit Japan, as Japanese culture exerted a great influence on his life and work. Stamos created drawings and brush stroke painting such as the "Tea House", which display an obvious Japanese influence. Stamos was ill, unfortunately, and was soon thereafter hospitalized. He could not risk a visit to Japan.

Masaaki enticed Takis Efstahiou to visit Tokyo, Kyoto, Osaka, Okayama, Hiroshima and Matsue. Takis became deeply involved with Japanese culture after this visit.

They have worked together since on a number of cultural projects, including the dedication of superb and significant sculptures to various Greek cities, which have resulted in a strengthening of the relationship between Greece and Japan.


New York Time Obituary of Theodoros Stamos

Theodoros Stamos, 74, Abstract Painter, Dies
By ROBERTA SMITH
Published: February 04, 1997

Theodoros Stamos, a precocious member of Abstract Expressionism's first generation and a prominent figure in a trial that rocked the art world in the 1970's, died on Sunday at the Hatsikosta Hospital in Yiannina, Greece, which he entered 12 days ago. He was 74 and lived in Manhattan and on the island of Lefkada, Greece.

He died of a lung ailment, said Takis Efstathiou, a friend.

Mr. Stamos was never considered an Abstract Expressionist of the first rank, and was nearly a generation younger than its chief innovators. But he committed himself to painting while still a teen-ager and was among the style's earlier adherents. He was also a close friend to many Abstract Expressionist artists, most famously Mark Rothko.

When Rothko committed suicide in 1970, Mr. Stamos had been named one of the three executors of his estate, along with Bernard J. Reis, an accountant, and Morton Levine, a professor of anthropology. In 1971, guardians acting on behalf of Rothko's children filed a petition against the executors charging that they had sold a large group of paintings to Rothko's representative, Marlborough Gallery, at an unusually high discount that was detrimental to his reputation, and that they were wasting the assets of the estate. The petition demanded their dismissal and cancellation of the contracts with Marlborough.

The petition noted that Mr. Reis was an officer of the gallery, and that Mr. Stamos was invited to join the gallery around the time of the sale. He had an exhibition there in 1972. The case eventually led to an eight-month trial that concluded in 1975, when Surrogate Millard A. Midonick ruled that Mr. Stamos and the other executors were guilty of negligence and conflict of interest. He dismissed them, canceled the contracts with Marlborough and levied $9.2 million in fines and assessments. Mr. Stamos paid his share by signing over to the Rothko estate his house, valued at $435,000, although Judge Midonick awarded him a life tenancy.

Mr. Stamos's reputation never recovered. He continued to exhibit his work in New York City, but less frequently, and at less prestigious galleries. His most recent exhibition was at the ACA Gallery in 1992. Nonetheless he exhibited often in other parts of the world, especially in Greece. For an exhibition at the Hiro Gallery in Tokyo in 1996 the biographical data chronicled his involvement with Rothko, his estate and the outcome of the trial.

Theodore Stamos was born in Manhattan on Dec. 31, 1922, the son of Greek immigrants who ran a hat-cleaning and shoeshine shop near St. Mark's Place. He began to draw while recovering from a ruptured spleen at the age of 8. He attended Stuyvesant High School where he studied art, mostly sculpture, for three years, quitting in 1939 just three months before graduation.

During the 1940's, Mr. Stamos supported his painting by running a small frame shop on East 18th Street in Manhattan where his customers included such artists as Arshile Gorky and Fernand Leger. He had his first solo show in New York at the Wakefield Gallery/Bookshop, run by Betty Parsons, who would later become a prominent dealer for Abstract Expressionists.

He was included in the 1945 Whitney Biennial; in 1946, the Museum of Modern Art acquired one of his paintings. The Modern also included his work in its legendary touring exhibition ''The New American Painting,'' which introduced Abstract Expressionism to European audiences in 1958 and '59. Between the late 1940's and 1970, Mr. Stamos exhibited regularly in New York, first with Ms. Parsons and then with Andre Emmerich.

Mr. Stamos's artistic style coalesced in the late 1940's and involved muted colors and soft-edged organic shapes somewhat influenced by the work of Milton Avery and William Baziotes. It was a style that he adhered to for the rest of his life, sometimes paring down the shapes to glowing fissures of color. Its strengths lay in its sense of muffled light and its sensitive, modulated surface. In the late 1980's, these surfaces turned thick and lunar and at times the lines of color would be backed by relaxed, squarish shapes reminiscent of Rothko's compositions.

Mr. Stamos's work is represented in public collections around the world.

He is survived by three sisters, Georgina Savas and Chrisula Venetsianos, of Manhattan, and Kostas Stamastelos

Photos > Kytherian Art

submitted by Lafcadio Hearn Files on 28.04.2013

The Spirit of Hermes sculpture at the Art Forum Gallery in Thessaloniki

The sculpture is 120 cm's high.

How did Masaaki become so involved in Greek culture?

Masaaki was introduced to Greek culture, and the work of Lacadio Hearn, through Art Collector, Takis Efsathiou.

Masaaki first met Lafcadio Hearn's grandson, Bon Koizumi at the Matsue Muesum, in Japan on July 5th 1996.

Takis Efstathiou organized Masaaki's first one person exhibition at the gallery Cyclades Antiebs in France in1995. At this time Masaaki travelled to Greece for the first time.

He visited Takis holiday house at Coulf, and then travelled to Lefkatha, Delfi and Athens. This visit had a profound infuence on his life and art, and began his involvement with Lafcadio Hearn, Greek culture, and Greece.

Takis Efstathiou then visited Japan for the first time. Together, in 1996 they organsised the Theodoros Stamos exhibition at the Hiro Gallery in Tokyo. Stamos was very keen to visit Japan, as Japanese culture exerted a great influence on his life and work. Stamos created drawings and brush stroke painting such as the "Tea House", which display an obvious Japanese influence. Stamos was ill, unfortunately, and was soon thereafter hospitalized. He could not risk a visit to Japan.

Masaaki enticed Takis Efstahiou to visit Tokyo, Kyoto, Osaka, Okayama, Hiroshima and Matsue. Takis became deeply involved with Japanese culture after this visit.

They have worked together since on a number of cultural projects, including the dedication of superb and significant sculptures to various Greek cities, which have resulted in a strengthening of the relationship between Greece and Japan.


New York Time Obituary of Theodoros Stamos

Theodoros Stamos, 74, Abstract Painter, Dies
By ROBERTA SMITH
Published: February 04, 1997

Theodoros Stamos, a precocious member of Abstract Expressionism's first generation and a prominent figure in a trial that rocked the art world in the 1970's, died on Sunday at the Hatsikosta Hospital in Yiannina, Greece, which he entered 12 days ago. He was 74 and lived in Manhattan and on the island of Lefkada, Greece.

He died of a lung ailment, said Takis Efstathiou, a friend.

Mr. Stamos was never considered an Abstract Expressionist of the first rank, and was nearly a generation younger than its chief innovators. But he committed himself to painting while still a teen-ager and was among the style's earlier adherents. He was also a close friend to many Abstract Expressionist artists, most famously Mark Rothko.

When Rothko committed suicide in 1970, Mr. Stamos had been named one of the three executors of his estate, along with Bernard J. Reis, an accountant, and Morton Levine, a professor of anthropology. In 1971, guardians acting on behalf of Rothko's children filed a petition against the executors charging that they had sold a large group of paintings to Rothko's representative, Marlborough Gallery, at an unusually high discount that was detrimental to his reputation, and that they were wasting the assets of the estate. The petition demanded their dismissal and cancellation of the contracts with Marlborough.

The petition noted that Mr. Reis was an officer of the gallery, and that Mr. Stamos was invited to join the gallery around the time of the sale. He had an exhibition there in 1972. The case eventually led to an eight-month trial that concluded in 1975, when Surrogate Millard A. Midonick ruled that Mr. Stamos and the other executors were guilty of negligence and conflict of interest. He dismissed them, canceled the contracts with Marlborough and levied $9.2 million in fines and assessments. Mr. Stamos paid his share by signing over to the Rothko estate his house, valued at $435,000, although Judge Midonick awarded him a life tenancy.

Mr. Stamos's reputation never recovered. He continued to exhibit his work in New York City, but less frequently, and at less prestigious galleries. His most recent exhibition was at the ACA Gallery in 1992. Nonetheless he exhibited often in other parts of the world, especially in Greece. For an exhibition at the Hiro Gallery in Tokyo in 1996 the biographical data chronicled his involvement with Rothko, his estate and the outcome of the trial.

Theodore Stamos was born in Manhattan on Dec. 31, 1922, the son of Greek immigrants who ran a hat-cleaning and shoeshine shop near St. Mark's Place. He began to draw while recovering from a ruptured spleen at the age of 8. He attended Stuyvesant High School where he studied art, mostly sculpture, for three years, quitting in 1939 just three months before graduation.

During the 1940's, Mr. Stamos supported his painting by running a small frame shop on East 18th Street in Manhattan where his customers included such artists as Arshile Gorky and Fernand Leger. He had his first solo show in New York at the Wakefield Gallery/Bookshop, run by Betty Parsons, who would later become a prominent dealer for Abstract Expressionists.

He was included in the 1945 Whitney Biennial; in 1946, the Museum of Modern Art acquired one of his paintings. The Modern also included his work in its legendary touring exhibition ''The New American Painting,'' which introduced Abstract Expressionism to European audiences in 1958 and '59. Between the late 1940's and 1970, Mr. Stamos exhibited regularly in New York, first with Ms. Parsons and then with Andre Emmerich.

Mr. Stamos's artistic style coalesced in the late 1940's and involved muted colors and soft-edged organic shapes somewhat influenced by the work of Milton Avery and William Baziotes. It was a style that he adhered to for the rest of his life, sometimes paring down the shapes to glowing fissures of color. Its strengths lay in its sense of muffled light and its sensitive, modulated surface. In the late 1980's, these surfaces turned thick and lunar and at times the lines of color would be backed by relaxed, squarish shapes reminiscent of Rothko's compositions.

Mr. Stamos's work is represented in public collections around the world.

He is survived by three sisters, Georgina Savas and Chrisula Venetsianos, of Manhattan, and Kostas Stamastelos

Photos > Kytherian Art

submitted by Lafcadio Hearn Files on 09.04.2013

Masaaki Noda

Photograph. Noda creating a sculpture in his studio.

Artistic Resume

1949 - Born, Fukuyama, Hiroshima, Japan

1969 -1972 - Osaka University of Arts, Osaka
1977- Left Japan for New York City
1977-1980 - The Art Students League of New York

Selected Solo Exhibitions:

1982 - ACWLP Gallery, New York, NY - Kew Gallery, New York, NY
1982, 1985 - Miriam Per Iman Gallery, Chicago, Illinois
1984, 1985 - Belle Art Gallery, Nyack, NY
1985 - Osaka Contemporary Art Center, Osaka
1986, 1991 - Yoh Art Gallery, Osaka
1986, 1991, 2000 - Gallery Hiro, Tokyo
1988, 1989 - Wenniger Gallery, Boston & Provincetown, MA
1987, 1990 - Gilbert Luber Gallery, Philadelphia, P A
1990 - Artist Gallery, New York, NY
1991 - Fukuyama Museum of Art, Fukuyama, Hiroshima
1992 - SPF US A Gallery and Library, Washington, DC
1995 - Galerie Les Cyclades, Antibes, France
1999 - 70th Art Gallery, New York, NY
2003 - Andre Zarre Gallery, New York, NY
2004 - Shenzhen Museum of Art, Shenzhen, China
2005 - Astrolavos Gallery, Athens, Greece - European Cultural Centre of Delphi, Greece
2006 - Fukuyama Museum of Art, Fukuyama, Hiroshima
2008 - Howard Salon, Taipei, Taiwan
2009 - The American College of Greece, Athens, Greece - Gallery Kiku, Osaka
2010 - Marathon Start Exhibition Center, Marathon Municipality
Selected Exhibitions & Projects:
1982 - International Aerial Art Orchestration (Sky Sculpture), Central Park, New York, NY
1992 - Visions in Between, The Art Foundation, New York, NY, Walker Hill Museum of Art, Seoul Korea,
Fukuyama Museum of Art, Fukuyama, Hiroshima
1994 - Theodoros Stamos, Jakob Bill, Masaaki Noda, Galerie Les Cyclades, Antibes, France
1997 - Two Stained Glass, 2.35x6.3M, 2x5.05M, Keihan Rail Road at Uji Station, Kyoto
1999 - Thirty Works by The Art Students League of New York, Alumini 1965 - 95, New York, NY
2000 - Stainless Steel Sculpture, 6MH, Shinichi-cho, Fukuyama, Hiroshima
2001 - Rain Forest Exhibition, Las Vegas Art Museum, Nevada, CA, Chinese Cultural Center, New York, NY, Asian Art s & Culture Center, Towson Uni
2002 - Stainless Steel Sculpture, 5MH, Tode High School, Fukuyama, Hiroshima
- A Century on Paper Prints by Art Students League Artists, 1999 -2001, UBS Paine Webber Art Gallery, New York, NY
2003 - Stainless Steel Sculpture 3MH, Hirano Kindergarten, Kannabe, Hiroshima
2004 - Stainless Steel Sculpture, 3.5MH, Shenzhen Museum of Art, Shenzhen, China - Athens Art Fair, Athens, Greece
2005 - Stainless Steel Sculpture, 3.8MH, European Cultural Centre of Delphi, Greece
2007 - Michael Michaeledes, Masaaki Noda, Art Forum Gallery, Thessaloniki, Greece
2008 - Two Glass Sculptures 0.3MH, 0.8MH & Painting 2.5x7.5M, Fukuyama City Center Library, Hiroshima
- Silent Dialogues, ACG Art Gallery, The American College of Greece, Athens, Greece
2009 - Stainless Steel Sculpture, 4MH, The American College of Greece, Athens, Greece
- Stainless Steel Sculpture, 3MH, Fukuyama Museum of Art, Fukuyama, Hiroshima
- The Open Mind of Lafcadio Hearn, ACG Art Gallery, Athens, Greece
2010 - Stainless Steel Sculpture, 5MH, Marathon Stadium, Mara thon Municipality, Greece
- Stainless Steel Sculpture, 2.7MH, Kishi Park, Matsue, Shimane
- The Open Mind of Lafcadio Hearn, Matsue Castle, Matsue, Shimane
2011 - Stainless Steel Sculpture, 3.85MH, Hiroshima City of Contemporary Art, Hiroshima
- Window Glass, 4x1.9M, Automatic Door, 2.3x2.8M, Fukuyama City University, Fukuyama, Hiroshima
- The Open Mind of Lafcadio Hearn, Nippon Gallery, New York, NY
2012 - Stainless Steel Sculpture, 7.15MH, Fukuyama Station Square, Fukuyama, Hiroshima

Selected Public Collections:

Albright-Knox Museum, Buffalo, NY
Art Students League of New York, NY Brooklyn Museum, Brooklyn, NY
Duxbury Art Complex Museum, Duxbury, MA Minnesota Art Museum, Minneapolis, MN Philadelphia Museum of Art, Philadelphia, PA Portland Art Museum, Portland, OR
Costakis Collection, Athens, Greece
Embassy of Japan, Athens, Greece
European Cultural Center of Delphi, Delphi, Greece
Macedoniko Museum of Contemporary Art, Thessaloniki, Greece
Marathon Museum, Marathon Municipality, Greece
Municipality of Lefcas, Lafcada, Greece
National Art Gallery, Athens, Greece
State Museum of Contemporary Art, Thessaloniki, Greece The American College of Greece, Athens, Greece Shenzhen Museum of Art, Shenzhen, China
Taipei Museum of Art, Taipei, Taiwan
Embassy of Greece in Japan, Tokyo
Fukuyama Museum of Art, Fukuyama, Hiroshima, Hiroshima City Museum of Contemporary Art, Hiroshima, Hiroshima Prefectural Art Museum, Hiroshima
Lafcadio Hearn Memorial Museum, Matsue, Shimane
Matsue City, Shimane
Tama Art University Museum of Art, Tokyo
Yamanashi Prefectural Museum of Art, Kofu, Yamanashi

Sponsors:

H.E. Mr. Nikolaos Tsamados, Ambassador of Greece in Japan
Takis Efstathiou, International Cultural Coordinator
Dimitrios Vassiliadis, University of Athens
Bon Koizumi, The University of Shimane Junior College
Shoko Koizumi
Noda Metal Working Industry Co., Ltd
Mishima Sangyo Co., Ltd


Fukuyama City
3-5 Higashisakura-machi, Fukuyama, Hiroshima
Tel 084-921 -2111
www.city.fukuyama.hiroshima.jp

Download a .pdf version of Masaaki Noda's Resume here:

Resume 1.pdf

Photos > Kytherian Art

submitted by Powerhouse Museum, Sydney on 14.05.2012

'Creation' rug, designed by Joice NanKivell Loch, Pyrgos, Greece, 1930 - 1960

Statement of significance

This handwoven rug is titled 'Creation' and was designed by Joice NanKivell Loch and woven by Turkish refugees in the village of Ouranopoulis, in Greece in the mid 1900s. Joice and her husband Sydney were deeply committed to alleviating poverty in Ouranoupolis. While visiting an elderly patient suffering from malnutrition, Joice became aware that the village women could use their weaving skills to earn income and saw this as an opportunity to help the villagers become self-sufficient. She sourced wool and cotton, had a loom built, learned about natural dyes and formed a women's weaving cooperative called Pyrgos Rugs.

Joice's designs had a distinctive Greek rather than Turkish identity, as anti-Muslim sentiment was strong in Greece. Inspiration for the designs came from frescoes, carvings and illuminated manuscripts that Sydney would photograph for her. Joice translated the photographic image into an intricate design featuring Byzantine motifs. The design for the 'Creation' rug features a circular motif composed of a two-headed dragon which is biting itself and 'breathing out' evolving plant and animal life.

Joice NanKivell Loch, who was born in Queensland in 1887 and died in 1982, is Australia's most decorated woman. This rug, with its Byzantine-inspired design, reflects Joice's extraordinary life and humanitarian work. In addition to the selfless work she and her husband engaged in for decades in Greece, she was an Allied agent during World War 2. On one occasion, she organised a train trip and rescued Jewish children from Nazi death camps by dressing them as Gentile daytrippers.

**Reference: Susanna de Vries, Blue ribbons, bitter bread: the life of Joice Nankivell Loch, Australia's most heroic woman, Pirgos Press-Tower Books, Sydney, 2006

(**A superb book).

Christina Sumner, Curator Decorative Arts & Design
September 2006

Production notes

This handwoven rug is called 'Creation' and was designed by Joice NanKivell Loch (b.1887) and woven by Turkish refugees in Pyrgos, Greece.

Joice Loch ran Pyrgos Rugs from her home in the historic tower of Prosforion in what was the former refugee village of Ouranoupolis. She organised a cooperative for the Turkish women of the village as well as the materials and looms. Most of the women and girls wove the rugs at home. Often two girls sat side by side at a loom weaving from designs Joice copied for them on graph paper - known as cartoons. Even girls who were unable to read or write were able to follow the cartoons which were nailed above the loom.

Joice's designs for the rugs had a distinctive Greek identity rather than Turkish, as anti-Muslim sentiment was strong. Inspiration for the designs came from frescoes, carvings and illuminated manuscripts that Sydney would photograph. Joice would translate the photographic image into an intricate design featuring Byzantine motifs. Natural hand-produced dyes were used for longer-lasting colour. Pink or pinkish beige as seen in this rug was produced by using pine chips with salt added as a mordant, or from willow bark to which alum had been added. Bright green was produced by fermenting cow manure and ivy leaves. A more brilliant hue could be attained by using human urine. Herbs, leaves, sawdust, berries, blossom, bark and beetles were also some of the ingredients used in the making of the natural dyes.

Pygros Rugs were marketed as luxurious collectibles featuring unique designs. Genuine Pyrgos rugs feature the 'Nutcracker Eagle' motif in some form.The motif is woven into a corner of the 'Creation' rug. The two-headed dragon is shown 'breathing out' evolving plant and animal life in a circular formation on a khaki background. The evolving plant and animal life is repeated in the border. The 'Nutcracker Eagle' motif is the oldest form of the double-headed eagle on nearby Mt Athos and originated from the carved wooden nutcrackers which were used by the early hermits on the Mountain.

Reference: Susanna de Vries, Blue ribbons, bitter bread: the life of Joice Nankivell Loch, Australia's most heroic woman, Pirgos Press-Tower Books, Sydney, 2006

History notes

The 'Creation' rug is testament to the extraordinary life of an exceptional Australian woman. Joice NanKivell Loch (1887-1982) was born into one of Australia's wealthiest families during a cyclone on a Queensland sugar plantation. The abolition of slave labour saw a reverse in the family fortunes and, determined to escape a life of poverty, Joice wrote children's stories and became one of Australia's first female journalists.

Joice met her husband, Sydney Loch, a Gallipoli veteran and writer, when she reviewed his Gallipoli book 'Straits Impregnable'. They married in 1918 and travelled to Ireland where they were commissioned to write an anti-IRA book. To escape the ire of the IRA, they travelled to Poland where they worked with the Quakers, rescuing countless dispossessed people from disease and starvation. In 1922, Joice and Sydney went to the refugee village of Ouranopoulis in Greece to work with the thousands of Greek Orthodox refugees fleeing Turkish persecution. They made their home in the tower of Prosforion which was built, in the shadow of Mt Athos, by a Byzantine emperor.

Joice and Sydney were deeply committed to alleviating poverty in Ouranoupolis. While visiting an elderly patient suffering from malnutrition, Joice became aware that the village women might use their weaving skills to earn income. They had been weavers in Turkey and Joice saw this as an opportunity to make the village self-sufficient. She sourced wool and cotton, had a loom built and formed a women's weaving cooperative, Pyrgos Rugs.

Being aware that anti-Muslim sentiment meant that rugs featuring Turkish designs in a Greek market would not sell, Joice based the designs for Pyrgos Rugs on ancient Greek motifs. She saw her rugs as 'art history' and also drew from prehistoric designs on cave walls in Australia, Africa and Europe. With perseverance and patience, Joice was able to persuade the women to weave rugs featuring Byzantine and other non-Turkish designs using natural dyes. Three of the very first Pyrgos Rugs designed by Joice won first prize at the International Trade Fair in Thessalonika. The success of Prygos Rugs was assured.

Other examples of Joice's courage and humanitarian efforts include working as an agent for the allies during World War 2. For example, she organised a train trip and rescued Jewish children from Nazi death camps by dressing them as Gentile daytrippers - it was given the codename 'Operation Pied Piper' by the British Foreign Office. Joice NanKivell Loch received a total of 11 medals from Greece, Poland, Romania and Britain for her humanitarian efforts and courage. She is Australia's most decorated woman and has been acknowledged by the Greek Orthodox Bishop of Oxford, as 'one of the greatest women of the 20th century.'

The 'Creation' rug was one of five Pyrgos rugs donated to the Australia Council. In 2005, the Council agreed to donate one of these to the Greek people for display in the Byzantine Museum in Ouranopolis (formerly the tower Prosforian which was Joice and Sydney's home.) Two rooms of the museum are dedicated to displaying Joice's work. The Council subsequently offered one of the remaining four rugs to the Powerhouse Museum; the rug selected was chosen as it best represents the Byzantine designs for which Pyrgos Rugs are renowned. The other three rugs have been retained by the Australia Council and are on public display in their Sydney offices.

Reference: Susanna de Vries, 'Blue ribbons, bitter bread: the life of Joice Nankivell Loch, Australia's most heroic woman', Pirgos Press-Tower Books, Sydney, 2006

This text content licensed under CC BY-NC.

Description
Rug, 'Creation', cotton / wool, designed by Joice NanKivell Loch, handwoven by Turkish refugees, Pyrgos, Greece, mid 1900s

Rectangular pile rug called 'Creation' with a Byzantine style design, handwoven with naturally dyed wool in pale green, khaki, pink and cream. The centre of the rug features four cream two-headed dragons, off-set from each corner. The two-headed dragon is 'breathing out' the evolution of plant and animal life in a circular formation on a khaki background; the evolving plant and animal life theme is repeated in the border which is itself edged with a narrow chevron outer border. The 'Nutcracker Eagle' motif in cream features in one corner, just inside the outer border, with possibly a Byzantine symbol in brown in the opposite corner.

Designed: NanKivell Loch, Joice; Pyrgos, Greece; 1930 - 1960

Registration number
2006/132/1

Production date
1930 - 1960

Width
1130 mm

This text content licensed under CC BY-SA.

Acquisition credit line
Gift of the Australia Council for the Arts, 2006

Subjects
+ Greek Australian culture
+ Textile design


Read more: http://www.powerhousemuseum.com/collection/database/?irn=361572#ixzz1uosG238R
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