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Urchins & Crabs

Natural History Museum > Urchins & Crabs

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Natural History Museum > Urchins & Crabs

submitted by Museum Administration on 17.10.2003

Four-Horned Spider Crab

The Four-horned spider crab, Pisa armata, has a triangular carapace with several spikes, notably three longs pairs at the rear. Carapace, 3.5 cm long,including spines. Photograph ©James Prineas, 2003

Natural History Museum > Urchins & Crabs

submitted by Museum Administration on 17.10.2003

Carapace of lobster or crayfish

This pale, striated, long-spiked carapace is from an unidentified lobster or crayfish. 3 cm long. Photograph ©James Prineas, 2003

Natural History Museum > Urchins & Crabs

submitted by Museum Administration on 17.10.2003

Marbled Crab

Absolutely stunning carapace of the Marbled or Running Crab, Pachygrapsus marmoratus. Squarish and beautifully patterned, this carapace is 3.5 cm wide. Photograph ©James Prineas, 2003

Natural History Museum > Urchins & Crabs

submitted by Museum Administration on 17.10.2003

Spiny Spider Crab

The Spiny Spider Crab, Maja squinado, has two big spines between the eyes, and a pear-shaped carapace with rosy pink spots. This one is 6 cm long. Photograph ©James Prineas, 2003

Natural History Museum > Urchins & Crabs

submitted by Museum Administration on 17.10.2003

Flapjack Lobster

Despite its name, this creature is actually a crayfish, Scyllarides latus. Its box-like carapace covers its head and thorax. This one is 3 cm long. Photograph ©James Prineas, 2003

Natural History Museum > Urchins & Crabs

submitted by Museum Administration on 17.10.2003

Swimming Crab

The Swimming Crab, Macropipus depurator is pinkish red, often with a deeper blush towards the eyes. Crab carapace, 2 cm wide. Photograph ©James Prineas, 2003

Natural History Museum > Urchins & Crabs

submitted by Museum Administration on 17.10.2003

Heart Urchins

These lovely animals are Heart Urchins, Brissus unicolor. In life their bodies are covered with fine spines, giving them a furry appearance. 2.5 and 3.5 cm long. Photograph ©James Prineas, 2003

Natural History Museum > Urchins & Crabs

submitted by Museum Administration on 17.10.2003

Green Sea Urchins

A small collection of Psammechinus microtuberculatos, better known as Green Sea Urchins. These range from 1.5 to 6 cm in diameter. Photograph ©James Prineas, 2003

Natural History Museum > Urchins & Crabs

submitted by Museum Administration on 17.10.2003

Pea Urchins

These fine little tests are the remains of miniature Sand Dollars known as Pea Urchins, Echinocyamus pusillus. Bright white with petal-like patterns, they all measure less than 1 cm long. Photograph ©James Prineas, 2003

Natural History Museum > Urchins & Crabs

submitted by Museum Administration on 17.10.2003

Violet Sea Urchin

This beautiful purple sea urchin, Sphaerechinus granularis can be identified by the ten narrow slits in the underside of its test. 6 cm diameter. Photograph ©James Prineas, 2003

Natural History Museum > Urchins & Crabs

submitted by Museum Administration on 17.10.2003

Black Sea Urchins

When cleaned, the Black Sea Urchin has a pinkish test with red lines, but in life it is covered with black spines that can cause painful wounds to the hands and feet. The spines usually can't be removed for several days, after which they can be gently squeezed out of the skin.

Tests of Black Sea Urchins, Arbacia lixula, 3 to 4.5 cm in diameter. Photograph ©James Prineas, 2003

Natural History Museum > Urchins & Crabs

submitted by Museum Administration on 17.10.2003

Rose Urchin

This beautiful sea urchin, Stylocidaris affinis, resembles a rose, with its orange center and radiating petal-like knobs. 3 cm diameter. Photograph ©James Prineas, 2003

Natural History Museum > Urchins & Crabs

submitted by Museum Administration on 17.10.2003

Spotted Heart Urchin

An intricate pattern of grey and white decorates this lovely Heart Urchin. 4 cm long. Photograph ©James Prineas, 2003

Natural History Museum > Urchins & Crabs

submitted by Museum Administration on 18.10.2003

Heart Urchin underside

The bottom of a gray-and-white spotted Heart Urchin test, showing the oral opening. Photograph ©James Prineas, 2003

Natural History Museum > Urchins & Crabs

submitted by Museum Administration on 17.10.2003

Large Heart Urchin

This large Heart Urchin, Brissus unicolor, is 9 cm long. Photograph ©James Prineas, 2003

Natural History Museum > Urchins & Crabs

submitted by Museum Administration on 17.10.2003

Urchin Teeth

The sea urchin mouth is on the animal's underside, and looks like a sharp little beak pointing out of the oral opening. Like the urchin itself, the chewing teeth are arranged with five-way symmetry. Photograph ©James Prineas, 2003