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Rocks


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Natural History Museum > Rocks

submitted by Museum Administration on 03.11.2004

Calcite

Calcite is a sedimentary mineral that occurs abundantly on Kythera in many structural forms. This translucent, golden-yellow piece is 6 cm long. Photograph by Peter B Tzannes, 2004

Natural History Museum > Rocks

submitted by Museum Administration on 03.11.2004

Rectangular Calcite

Calcite can cleave into neat rectangular shapes. 2.5 cm long. Photograph by Peter B Tzannes, 2004

Natural History Museum > Rocks

submitted by Museum Administration on 03.11.2004

Calcite Crystals

Calcite crystals, found near Fratsia. 10 cm long. Photograph by Peter B Tzannes, 2004

Natural History Museum > Rocks

submitted by Museum Administration on 03.11.2004

Calcite Wedge

A wedge of translucent, golden calcite, 5 cm long. Photograph by Peter B Tzannes, 2004

Natural History Museum > Rocks

submitted by Museum Administration on 03.11.2004

Banded Calcite

A beautiful beach stone made of bands of calcite, pelites and limestone. 6 cm. Photograph by Peter B Tzannes, 2004

Natural History Museum > Rocks

submitted by Museum Administration on 03.11.2004

Darkened Calcite

The dark color of this piece of calcite is probably due to the presence of iron. 6 cm. Photograph by Peter B Tzannes, 2004

Natural History Museum > Rocks

submitted by Museum Administration on 03.11.2004

Calcite

A large and beautiful piece of calcite, found in a road cut near Fratsia. 16 cm across. Photograph by Peter B Tzannes, 2004

Natural History Museum > Rocks

submitted by Museum Administration on 03.11.2004

Rhombohedral Calcite

This type of calcite is opaque and milky white, and cleaves into flat, shiny surfaces. 5 cm. Photograph by Peter B Tzannes, 2004

Natural History Museum > Rocks

submitted by Museum Administration on 03.11.2004

Calcite formed on Limestone

Calcite minerals growing on a limestone host. 8 cm long. Photograph by Peter B Tzannes, 2004

Natural History Museum > Rocks

submitted by Museum Administration on 03.11.2004

Stalagmite

This large stalagmite is so beautiful, we've included two pictures of it here. 20 cm x 28 cm. A generous gift from the family of Bill de Leeuw. Photograph by Peter B Tzannes, 2004

Natural History Museum > Rocks

submitted by Museum Administration on 03.11.2004

Stalagmite

Stalagmites and stalactites are made of calcium carbonate, and formed in caves by dripping water. This magnificent example is 20 cm wide and 28 cm high, a generous gift from the family of Bill de Leeuw. Photograph by Peter B Tzannes, 2004

Natural History Museum > Rocks

submitted by Museum Administration on 03.11.2004

Concretionary calcite

This 3.5-cm piece of calcite was found in the caves beneath Kypriotianika. Photograph by Peter B Tzannes, 2004

Natural History Museum > Rocks

submitted by Museum Administration on 03.11.2004

Calcite thumbprint

This piece of calcite, growing on a host rock, is swirled and folded to look like a thumbprint. 11 cm high, found on the beach near Diakofti. Photograph by Peter B Tzannes, 2004

Natural History Museum > Rocks

submitted by Museum Administration on 03.11.2004

Calcite rods

Concretionary calcite is formed by dripping water. These ‘fingers’ are similar in structure to stalactites, and range from 2 to 5 cm in length. Found near Diakofti. Photograph by Peter B Tzannes, 2004

Natural History Museum > Rocks

submitted by Museum Administration on 03.11.2004

Travertine

Travertine is a noncrystalline form of calcite, opaque, massive, and colorful. It is formed during the evaporation of water. This piece was found near Diakofti. 9.5 cm. Photograph by Peter B Tzannes, 2004

Natural History Museum > Rocks

submitted by Museum Administration on 03.11.2004

Graphite

Graphite is one of the world’s softest minerals, and forms in masses or sheets. It is opaque black, soft and light, and has a submetallic luster. 6 cm, northern Kythera. Photograph by Peter B Tzannes, 2004

Natural History Museum > Rocks

submitted by Museum Administration on 03.11.2004

Aragonite

Aragonite has the same chemical composition as calcite, but crystallizes in a different pattern and doesn’t cleave as distinctly. This piece, 4.5 cm, was found near Fratsia. Photograph by Peter B Tzannes, 2004

Natural History Museum > Rocks

submitted by Museum Administration on 03.11.2004

Mica Foil

Mica has a highly metallic luster, and when it forms in sheets over a host rock it looks as though the rock has been covered in metal foil. 7 cm, found in northwestern Kythera. Photograph by Peter B Tzannes, 2004

Natural History Museum > Rocks

submitted by Museum Administration on 03.11.2004

Mica

Mica is found commonly in schists, its metallic luster is unmistakable. This small piece is 2.5 cm, found in northern Kythera. Photograph by Peter B Tzannes, 2004

Natural History Museum > Rocks

submitted by Museum Administration on 03.11.2004

Peridotite

Peridotite is an ultramafic rock found on Kythera. It may be green, dark green, or black. This rounded, conical piece has the color of an avocado. 3 cm.
Photograph by Peter B Tzannes, 2004