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Insects and Kin

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Natural History Museum > Insects and Kin

submitted by Museum Administration on 16.10.2003

Rose Beetle, underside

Underside of Rose Beetle, a gorgeous insect, uniformly green and glittering. Photograph © James Prineas, 2003

Natural History Museum > Insects and Kin

submitted by Museum Administration on 16.10.2003

Rose Beetle, side view

In midsummer the opening artichoke blossoms provide a delicious nectar for rose beetles. The the emerald-green beetles against the lavender-colored flowers is a magnificent sight.

Photograph © James Prineas, 2003

Natural History Museum > Insects and Kin

submitted by Museum Administration on 16.10.2003

Cicada, underside

A belly-up view of a cicada, showing mouthparts and other cool stuff. 4.5 cm.

Photograph © James Prineas, 2003

Natural History Museum > Insects and Kin

submitted by Museum Administration on 11.10.2003

Cicada

On Kythera, the song of summer is the cicada’s constant buzz, perfectly captured in its Greek name, “tzitziki”. The sound is made only by the males.

Dried cicada, 4.5 cm. Photograph © James Prineas, 2003

Natural History Museum > Insects and Kin

submitted by Museum Administration on 11.10.2003

Cicada Nymph Skin

Skin of cicada nymph.

Immature cicadas are called nymphs. They live underground for 4 to 20 years (depending on the species), sucking the juice from plant roots. When the nymph is fully mature, it climbs a tree-trunk. Then its skin splits open and an adult cicada emerges.

Cicada nymph skin, 3.5 cm long. Gift of Joanna Mitchell. Photograph © James Prineas, 2003

Natural History Museum > Insects and Kin

submitted by Museum Administration on 11.10.2003

Cricket

The cricket is a serious pest, capable of devouring many times its weight in crops. But its chirping song, made by rubbing the forewings together, is lovely music. Though cricket song varies according to species, the actual tempo depends on whether it is night or day, sunny or cloudy, and warm or cool.

Photograph © James Prineas, 2003

Natural History Museum > Insects and Kin

submitted by Museum Administration on 16.10.2003

Cricket, underside

Underside of a cricket, in full lotus yoga position.

Photograph © James Prineas, 2003

Natural History Museum > Insects and Kin

submitted by Museum Administration on 11.10.2003

Grasshopper

While grasshoppers can do real damage to crops, they are also a valuable food source for large birds and small mammals. On Kythera the grasshoppers come in all sizes and colors.

Dried grasshopper, 6 cm. Gift of Joanna Mitchell. Photograph © James Prineas, 2003

Natural History Museum > Insects and Kin

submitted by Museum Administration on 11.10.2003

Scorpion

The scorpion is fierce looking and scary, with sharp pincers on its claws, and a sharp stinger at the end of its tail. The scorpions on Kythera can cause a lot of pain, but won’t do any permanent damage. Scorpions sting only in self-defense, especially when pressure is applied from above, which is a good reason to wear shoes around the house.

Scorpion, 2.5 cm. Photograph © James Prineas, 2003